My poetry n lyrics, feedback n sharing welcome

My poems 

All My poems 

Prayer From Me An Australian Aborigine….

Goodmornin World and those of us on the other side,
What another beautiful day,
The earth, the water and the sky,
as it was in the beginning of time.
The children of ancestors, 
so strong and wise, 
we still learning bout peaces prize,
Please keep us from pain and resentment, 
Our children smiling
And our old people contented
We pray to be grateful
And give thanks for life

By Kaiyu Bayles

You go! 

Yes u got pain sista girl
Loosin your mama ain’t easy
Split up from your grandma well that’s real hard too!
What happens when your not safe changes everything about you
Sayin goodbye to old friends and babies too
But plenty of people before you made it through

Your allowed to cry, it’s been tough
On your own u need more than luck
Take that pain sis its yours,and love it
Yeas you could have been this and that
But you can’t take that back
Look after yourself – relax

No fears with the tears
Let them flow
Choking n smoking
Feeling yourself grow
It’s ok Sis – let it go

Look back on pain and happiness
Live in the moment
Create that bliss
And remember without the blues
 you wouldn’t be you

By Kaiyu Bayles

WHY CANT I JUST B ME 

Why cant I just be Kaiyu
Why cant I just be me
All this stress n responsibility
I just wanna be free

Yaraka, Mara, Jyda, Kia, Binowee
They all me
Alison, Laina N Dee
Let me Be, You go, Be free

Granny here now, I’m feelin sad
Don’t know what’s goin on. N feelin bad
Everythings goin to be all right
Just one more night

By Kaiyu Bayles

Take A Moment

To think about the clothes you’re in
Are You Comfortable
To think about that house you call home
Is it really a Castle?
To think about the family you’re in
How happy is everyone and why?

Take a moment
Before you leave today
Think
What makes you happy?
And what does not
Because change
Starts with you…so
Take a moment

Greet the day
Just as our ancestors did
Speak words of kindness
To ourselves too
Heal your pain
Let yourself free
Eat the foods of the earth
Swim in her oceans and lakes
Say I love you at least once a day

Take a moment
Remember we are all great
Free yourself from the chains
How can you be?
If you’re not happy
Go back to being that free spirited child
We all deserve to be free
We can and will make it right… Just
Take moment

Love the skin your in
Discover your true talents
Practice Gratitude and fewer attitudes
Love Peace More and Hate War Less
Still having trouble? Well that’s cool too
When you c that child smiling
That’s what it’s all about
Yes there’s negativity all around
But change is a coming
But first we all have to

Take a moment
Own our pain, heal it
Breath, Lets not exist but live life
Hold on to your loved ones
Lead the way for all
Let love and positivity rule
Not politicians, jobs and school
Let’s recreate true happiness
For one and all
Take a moment
.. ..
More answers lay deep in our beautiful lands
Turn to our brothers and sisters who carry the true way forward
Harmony, balance and respect for great and small
Since the beginning
This can be ours now
Handed down through you and me

Take a moment
We will move forward soon
We have to dig deeper in time
Make those ancient laws yours and mine
Teach them to our children, communities and countries
Are we heading for destruction as 1 people?
Have the answers for a real proper society been left in time?

Take a moment
For the future of all
Maintain principals that stand tall

Take this moment right now

By Kaiyu Bayles

Reverse It

Reverse It… please,

wearing rags, clothes I mean,

happiness hardly seen,

Loosing sight of whats right, learnin nothing in schools,

Talking English, Living in houses and Jails, no good rules

Money supposed to be important, people always fight

Na Not me, I’m Indigenous to Thee

We belong to beauty possessed by you and me, but now we all crying

All together was Mother Earths creations, laying, walking and flying,

Words of wisdom, love in everyone, peace always a given

Free we was, off our home we were driven

I can feel the pain and the sorrow,

What will come tomorrow?

Whiteman, yellow man, black man need to make a stand….

Make their ways count, discover the lors we have for this land

Save us all….  No more Jails, Housing estates, highways, murders and rapes

No more Red tape…..  Reverse it Please!

We might all be free, not just the old aborigine

Kaiyu Moura

Let’s Indigenize it all ay?

My poems Freedom

Eyes open mind shut
Gonna start the day? Nuh
Mumma’s gone, granny two,
N the population, we 2.2
No more boomerang no more spear
We reachen for the powder, yarndi, n beer
The chains remain, see the pain
Hear the silence, no rain?
Pain and suffering day after day
Old n young searchin for a new way
Gotta organise, stick together and stay strong
No more these fullas, doin us all wrong
We know what ought to be done
Let’s lead the way and on the way we goinn have some 

Freedom was taken but we can get it back
Love that skin your in, the family your in we not slack
Freedom – we got the red yellow and black
Live life to the fullest, with the finest, never crack
Freedom- 4 one an alll – back on track
Good times and good friends
Together we can be, we gots to be
Like the wind, birds, ocean and sea
FREE

Indiginise your mind, hear the music
Free your body, move your feet
Dance with mother natures mystic beat
Speack your tongue,
live with love!
Listen to the echoes of the past
We gotta get freedom fast
Cancer, tumurs and heart disease
Animals disappearing and cutting our trees
Time to change the fight, no more struggle
Ask them fullas do the right
Not just by us, by their ole fullas,
They must!

Disabled by physicals, racism, hate or greed
Freedom’s what we all need

Empowered by the idea of freedom in every way for all – achieved through the concepts of indigenization.  Hit a nerve?  Let’s brainstorm
 
By Kaiyu Bayles

My poems Wheres the tribe?

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
My bodies giving in, tell me their alive.
How many are crying? Tired of trying?
Forgotten people, forgotten time? Not in my mind.

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
I got to get there, drive, swim or fly.
Ther’ll be no more ear ache, from no-good words
And no eating this food, feeling worse afterwards.

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
Got you in my heart and freedom’s in our path.
Connecting back up with one another
The animals, our ways and the land, our mother.

Here is my people. Here is my tribe.
Human being roaming free, the ole spirit inside of me.
Ready? Our season is near. Just like our wildflower
With the might and strength of our creator,
We shall bloom a new era.
Breathe…Be at Ease…Believe…

By Kaiyu Bayles

My lyrics, i need a bit of help with getting the message out.

Deep B.L.A.C.K Songlist

Is It Always Going To Feel This Way?

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

This our Island home
Free n easy we roam.
Disrupted 100,000 years of peace
For convicts and their police.
You’ve no jurisdiction,
With a history like science fiction.
Cause we have listened, we have learned, 
We have laughed, cried and yearned…
So this Westminster system with no jurisdiction
Is about to be overturned.

Confusioned, disillusion,  
where’s the rebelution?
Keep a check on how we feel,
Are we all keeping real?
Keep checkin our relation
Cause from nation to nation
We are all racin to nowhere land and
We need to understand…

Because, it’s not meant to be like this
Bein helpless
Not meant to feel like this
Clenchin our fists. 
Kneeling and praying each day,
Is it always going to feel this way?

(Language)

GOORI’S!!!!!!!!!!
Rise up, Rise up, Rise up.
Sovereign people still today
For a new day, for our old ways.
Time to thrive,  we have survived.
Even modern day genocide.
Colonisation, segregation, assimilation and  now reconciliation…
Got all our ears achin!
So let’s go walkabout n coorooboree now..
Dreamin’s alla time – anytime, 

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

 It’s not meant to be like this
Lacking a mothers kiss
Not meant to feel like this
Lil joyfulness
If we kneel n pray, for it to go away
 Is it always goin to feel this way?

This land where you stand needs man to understand
This is sacred land,
Everywhere you walk, sit or stand,
Our people been there.
Home 2 da rainbow serpent and red sand
Law, histories, song and dance.
It’s coming back from the surface
To put an end to this circus.
We know a better way
From living in a better day.
Now Sssshhh, while we watch our children play.
There ain’t no mystery
We governed, we tilled and documented history.
In 2011 you can’t get away with Invasion
Put an end to this illegal occupation, of a nation, 
Stop rations, listen,  be patient.
Kicking off the heads of our next generation,
Now still victims of corporate rascists.
We the key ingredient!
All this talk, anybody meanin it?
Experience and understanding is seldom 
Yet knowledge plus consequences, equals, wisdom.
Don’t it?

Not meant to be like this,
Life is politics
Not meant to feel like this
Bunch of lunatics at it,
If we try a different way
Is it always goin to feel this way?

(Language)

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

No, No, No,
It’s not to be this way
Our spirit still strong today
It’s not meant to feel this way
Sing, dance, shout now n play
The ole way back for a new day.

Together: Dedicated to our great, great, great, great, greats,
we shall b free In our home country.
To all our childrens, childrens, childrens, children,
Keep on smiling and thrivin on your Aboriginal Island.

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!
(language) 

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

The Block Rocks

Holden Street’s where my family began,
Nan hiding under the bed 
From the devil man.
Mum fought her way through,
No one had it easy I knew.
Cards was the go, though
But no takin things slow. though
The Railway view, The Clifton, The Empress.
Koori’s here dress to impress.
We got style,
Leave Paris in Denial.
And our love is strong
Kisses and cuddles are long.
Don’t mess around 
Or the block will come down
Around
You!

(Language)

Chorus:
The Block rox!
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Don’t mess it up!

From Newcastle, Mooli, n Cowra
To Walgett, Moori n Cumra!
We’ll be gatherin till eternity
And now it’s up to you and me!
To give the men a hand
Help with em a plan
Culture centre & Sports centre, we a solid community.
Let’s get  it together true Redfern unity
All the block babies, warriors, soldiers,
Everyone knows now cause we told em.
Hold up ya hands if ya care!
N Scream I’m there
(I’m there)
I Care
(I care)
If that qualified as a petition
The world would listen.

Since the beginning of their visiting
We been holdin em out – resisting.
Pamulway, Tedbury,
They showed the way!
Uncle Doug, Uncle Ken n Uncle Max,
They knew not to be too relaxed.
Like the Redfern All Blacks
Keep the ball in motion,
Just like a rolling ocean.
Truth is always the potion,
Let’s move this notion.

The Block Rox!

(language)

Chorus:
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!

Forget the Harbour Bridge, Centre Point, The Rocks,
Bondi & Darling Harbour  – the Block Rox!
What a sad day
That one in Botany Bay.
So called brutes and Terranulias.
You fulla’s shamed your king and yourselves,
Changing paradise into a colony.
Forgetting along the way, humanities.
But now we strong and each one of us is free.
Hardened by misery.
Cause today the top dogs 
Still bring in the top rocks.
But No matter what 
The Block will always Rock!
Yes its the black heart,
Redfern was the very start,
Of many things, great.
A late congrats to all who’d congregate,
for our communities, our race.
FACTSIA, Activists, 
With all the mad tactics
Medical centre and childcare.
Still on the Block we always share.
For the work you do, 
We all thank you
Uncle Shane, Aunty Ali n all the mob that rallies 
Together for Redfern, it’s your turn 
to sing:

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

Chorus: 
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!

To the whole Redfern family,
U a big part of me.
Specially those we’ve lost.
And we’ll never loose the block!
No sellin off
To no yupee lot
I oppose any notion 
That goes against the grain of the people n the emotion.
I hope this message travels across the land,
All hear it, Koori woman and man.
The blocks still under threat,
They tryin to knock it down n attack it with bricks and cement.
Is any body available – (to comment?)
Whose liable,
When the grandchildren come to gather
And there’s not even a shadow.
To remind them of the times,
All the years, all the people gone by?
All the years Redfern shines,
Always so fresh in my heart and mind.
I’m one to put a stop to, well start…
We can’t be sold out by no retard.
No disrespect.
No harm meant.
Be accountable,
Don’t let it fall!
I can’t it’s where I learnt to crawl!
N people there changed my nappy…
The block is where we’re all happy!

Cause 

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

(language)

Chorus: 
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!
You only got one shot.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

Breathe

Chorus: 
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

Language (fast dance beat)

Cause they don’t know how they feel,
Let’s keep these dictators reel.
We been driven from our lands.
Are we controlled by the man?
All is as it’s meant to be.  They say.
And we can’t fix a world that’s not broken 
But so many words go unspoken.
So man’s direction has to be criticised
For disillusioned plans to civilise.
We the most documented race,
But nobody really knows,
Even though on 
All of our faces it shows.  

Chorus: 
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

But people care, there to lend a helping hand.
Is it enough though?
Life is tough you know?
Open your eyes; wanna scream?
Everything is as it’s meant to be.
Everything’s just as it’s meant to be?
Would I change a thing?
This damn democracy is crazy!
No, don’t, stop that, you can’t,
Even babies aren’t free.
These puppeteers of false mastery
Better off stickin to customary law…real mastery.

Kaiyu: Gotta look after number one?
How do you tell that to a mum?
All those who’ve had enough, open your heart
Where do they start?
Hear their screams,( is ok?)
What bout they dreams
Can we walk away because we feel this way…?
When lil help never went astray.

People care and someone’s always there.
The greatest of us, grew up tough,
Overcoming feelings of giving up.
So don’t scream, just breathe.
In n Out    In n Out  (background fast beat – In out, In out at same time).

C’mon people share and care to understand, first…
Kaiyu: Breath in and out.

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

Patty: Does the world get colder as we get older?
Can’t get sick, need an ear or a shoulder?
The unity is missin
From our communities.
To raise our children proper,
Let’s set up camp wherever.

People do care – there to lend a hand
Listen carefully – to the land
Open our eyes – we all got to realise…
People care – even wen the problem ain’t theirs.
Sing and dance now.

Close your eyes.
Close your mind.
Because everything, 
everything is as it’s meant to be.

Together, lets send love to all suffering and for freedom,
For the war torn and oppressed,
The hungry n homeless.

Together: Do we care? Care to really understand,
How we really feel?
How we really live?
Might make us wanna scream, but…
Take it slowly and… breathe.
Care to share n be there,
For the ones you love,
Before we give up.
Dare to dream,
Quieten our minds and breathe.

And join together,
One mob forever.
Bring our best selves
Aim for the top shelves.
And start to care
Or it could be the end of man, damn.
In the meantime, just breathe….

In n out (In out, In out).
In n out (In out, In out).

Language (fast dance beat)

Chorus:
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release me.
All is as it’s meant to be.
Just Breathe In N Out 
(Breath in out, in out).

  
 
Sunshine In A Concrete Haze

Lil Kaiyu down Waterloo,
Down the PCYC you can find me, 
The factory, Laundromat,
The fern or market.
Not quiet what life was meant to be,
Shops n a lane – not reel free.
We were happy
Eatin fruit from a tree,
Drinkin water from a whole in the conrete.
Little women,
Meetin up – goin swimmen, 
Down the PA,
Go home n u have to stay.
No idea what was round the corner,
Sis, wished I could’ev warned ya.
Cuase it felt too good
In our lil neighbourhood
Across from the Rabbits
N all the bad habbits
So much goin down in our home town 
We were too busy bein little clowns

Chorus:
You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Your bodies tired and mind’s even worse,
You’ve seen it all 
N aint nothing to live for.
But this is your land!
Bloods on white hands!
You and me,
We free.
Send all the majik U can find,
Heal that pain and see us shine.
Our grannies were taken,
Our children forsaken.
And trying to awaken
From this nightmare called life,
Trouble, strife.
Old n new trauma is too much pain
For one too maintain.
It’s not all in vein,
Cause we can all remain
Part of that long, long chain.

(language)

Chorus:
You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

We free to enjoy each other n loving this experience,
Make time to cry n still marvel at our brilliance.
We can learn to live, love n laugh,
Even if making the most of this day is hard.
Learn just 1 word, listen n smile,
Play with children, run a mile.
Our mind needs exercise.
Soon we’ll all realise,
With these strong blood lines,
It’s still our time.
Swim in our waters, eat our food,
Rid all problems with mood.
And with all this began,
Wat will invasion really have done.
Aborigine – part o’ u’s in part of me.
Me n you, you n you, we gotta become we.
We all branches off the one tree.
That’s how we put an end to world hostility.

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!
Chorus:

You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits free to roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

(language)

This song is dedicated to the sufferers of invasions. There experiences are a direct result of systems gone wrong from the beginning.  Who feels it the most? The disadvantaged. Even though they do not engage in it in any way they experience the brink of the rapes, the violence, the murders, drugs, degradation and overall disregard of one of the greatest treasures of all time. Human Kind.

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

 
 
Is It Always Goin 2 Feel This Way?

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

This our Island home
Free n easy we roam.
Disrupted 100,000 years of peace
For convicts and their police.
You’ve no jurisdiction,
With a history like science fiction.
Cause we have listened, we have learned, 
We have laughed, cried and yearned…
So this Westminster system with no jurisdiction
Is about to be overturned.

Confusioned, disillusion,  
where’s the revolution?
Keep a check on how we feel,
Are we all keeping real?
Keep checkin our relation
Cause from nation to nation
We are all racin to nowhere land and
We need to understand…

Because it’s not meant to be like this
Bein helpless
Not meant to feel like this
Clenchin our fists. 
Kneeling and praying each day,
Is it always going to feel this way?

(Language)

GOORI’S!!!!!!!!!!
Rise up, Rise up, Rise up.
Sovereign people still today
For a new day, for our old ways.
Time to thrive,  we have survived.
Even modern day genocide.
Colonisation, segregation, assimilation and  now reconciliation
Got all our ears achin!
So let’s go walkabout n coorooboree now..
Dreamin’s alla time – anytime, 

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

Patty: It’s not meant to be like this
Lacking a mothers kiss
Not meant to feel like this
Lil joyfulness
If we kneel n pray, for it to go away
Kaiyu: Is it always goin to feel this way?

Patty: This land where you stand needs man to understand
This is sacred land,
Everywhere you walk, sit or stand,
Our people been there.
Our rainbow serpent and red sand
Law, histories, song and dance.
It’s coming back from the surface
To put an end to this circus.
We know a better way
From living in a better day.
Now Sssshhh, while we watch our children play.
There ain’t no mystery
We governed, we tilled and documented history.
In 2008 you can’t get away with Invasion
Put an end to this illegal occupation, of a nation, 
Stop rations, listen,  be patient.
Kicking off the heads of our next generation,
Now victims of corporate rascists.
We the key ingredient!
All this talk anybody meanin it?
Experience and understanding is seldom 
Yet knowledge plus consequences, equals wisdom.
Don’t it?

Not meant to be like this,
Life is politics
Not meant to feel like this
Bunch of lunatics at it,
If we try a different way
Is it always goin to feel this way?

(Language)

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

No, No, No,
It’s not to be this way
Our spirit still strong today
It’s not meant to feel this way
Sing, dance, shout now n play
The ole way back for a new day.

Together: Dedicated to our great, great, great, great, greats,
we shall overcome In our home country.
To all our childrens, childrens, childrens, children,
Keep on smiling and thrivin on your Aboriginal Island.

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!
(language) 

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

  
 Anything Is Possible

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Your beautiful, spiritual n sensual,
So young, yet so sensible.
You make me shine
N smile all the time.
I never knew I was so strong,
I hadn’t been happy for so long.
This love is amazing,
It drives me crazy.
And when I look at you,
That light is shinning thru.
Enjoyin the kids and life,
I’d gladly be your wife.
Because with you, anything is possible,
Everything is real.

(Language)

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Oh n how u love me,
You believe in me,
Your overwhelmin me,
By helping me get to my feet.
With you I feel complete.
I hold your hand, 
Proud to call you my man.
We can do anything,
Together just being.
We’re so happy.
All the time.
N it’s our time to shine.

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Yes let’s fish n swim,
The way u treat u’r woman.
U know how to have fun,
Lift my head when its hung.
Talk, play the PSP
Books, n movies,
We even paint beautifully,
Create a life mural.
I promise we’ll do well.
I’m here for you,
Right next to you.
All the way,
What he say.
N for me you do the same.
You’re a father, a hunter.
N ooohhh I  just luv ya
With you anything is possible
Everything is real.

(Language)

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
We belong forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
We belong forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Herstory

Matriarch, sacred feminine,
The sun moon balance.
Divinity decided by vanity.
And so becomes history.
Your hollyness was a man
His other half – you guessed it, a woman.
Standing strong
Ready to carry the messages on.
I’m a disciple of the old way,
Again and again you’ll hear me say,
Herstory is here to stay!

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

Free thinker have learned
Back then we’d a be burned.
Like the first testament
N the scriptures
That might contain some truth.
Who they tryin to fool,
Telling us all to believe
This father of Jesus,
Made us?
Our mothers created us.
Believe in ourselves.
G.O.D
Is the Great Out Doors.
So pay attention to the seasons,
And look at all the reasons, 
We ended up here.
We’re in drivers seat – steer.
Look after the sisters
Nurture her.
Or stay clear n live in harmony with mother nature
She’ll save ya.
There’s a female half to all things,
Can’t u c it’s missing?
We are out of balance and out of wack,
Herstories got to come back.

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

Dubai, Jundal, Kudgerie!
Woman Magic!

Why do you mock our business?
Ladies night at clubs,
Distasteful pubs.
Cause women are the champions of all time.
Standing behind,
At the brink of crime.
So with this rhyme
I hope to remind you all
We there to pick u up fall after fall.
Nurture you more and more.
Heal your pain,
Stop the world from goin insane.
So let’s go back, back in time.
To a way even I’d be happy to live by.
And instead of worshippin myths and legends,
Kings and Queens- 
There is no other,
Like a mother.
Yes it’s pagan
Like Yagan.
Where we began.
Fire, water, sun and moon,
When it’s full notice, that change in you?
And harvest times were Christmas 
Before Christians.
But we still half thinkers, missin…
What is it? The feminine.
So let’s get in touch with it,
We all need mothering.

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

You gotta know it –
To be a warrior
You gotta show it – 
To be a soldier
You gotta luv it – 
Let her rock ya, world!
In the Moonlight,
Watch us shine bright.
To drum beats,
We movin right.
Loving all of it, 
Lookin sweet!
Needin leeders,
We need her.
Believe that
No matter what!
You know where we came from now let’s
Live a life that’s wholesome.

Dubai, Jundal, Kudgerie!
Woman Magic!
Chorus x 2

 
 
Look Out…

(warning: contains issues dealing with sexual violence)

We feel like scrubbing hard,
Runnin a yard,
Punch and scream real loud.
And you, your runnin you coward,
Leavin me forever in half,
In your path.
Hope you soon land in hell. 
What just happened – who to tell?
Where’s my safe place?
Keep my mind at a safe pace.
Dr’s, lawyers, police, family n Psychology,
How’s anyone gonna help me?
Grown men to lil girls, 
Upside down goes their worlds.

I’m goin to see you one day,
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help.
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to repair what’s no longer there.

Where, how do people loose control,
And take like a car needs petrol.
I hope you get help soon,
Before a new victims doom.
But where do we start,
Being worlds apart?
I feel sick, I’m scared,
You, you better be scarred.
Love n kindness not
Anger n violence.

I’m goin to see you one day.
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to face your disgrace.

Care to loosen
This noose I’m wearin?
Ever thought about it
All the pain created?
That you initiated,
Debilitating.
Worth the lives taken?
One day soon I’l be free
From the misery you put on me.
My body’s my shrine
And more importantly it’s mine.
If I forgave you 
What would that do?
Really, how much good is still in you?
Plus.. the pain you cause,
You could never undo.

I’m goin to see you one day,
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help.
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to prepare.

Years of living lost,
You cant imagine the loss.
Is this any skin of your nose?
I really gotta know.
I am going to see you and I’l have all day.
I want to hear what you have to say.
I will walk away, start again.
For you – I’ll just say
Poor thing!

Kids Weekend

No tears, no fears, you got t be strong
Got to find a place where you belong.
Just shying away
Where faith dances straight.
Take time out, dig deep, deep down.
Keep your head up high, u’r feet on the ground.
We decide how we’ll feel.
We decide how we heal.
Fillin our day with laughter and play, (please)
Look after each other and send love each day.
Seek n u shall find
What treasures I hide in my mind.

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

Wanna start out happy
All the family
Kids clean behind us 
For there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I’m me – who I’m meant to be
I’m a kid, I’m a kid!
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid.

I think I’ll fly a plane
N hope it don’t rain.
Then play shops
And buy the lot.
We’ll pretend to go to work
N that someone gets hurt.
We can be ten foot tall
Without a problem at all
But when I’m feelin down,
Please don’t turn around.
Cause one day soon
(I promise) I’ll be big like you.
But it don’t look real fun 
so let’s walk, not run.
And let’s get the party 
Begun.

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

I Wanna start out happy
All the family 
Kids clean behind us 
For there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I’d rather you be you – n I be me.
Cause I’m a kid, I’m a kid!
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid.
So you be you n I be me.

I can imagine being called your honour
Or being the prime minister.
If it were up to me maybe the world wouldn’t be so messed up.
I can play basketball,
Even pretend to start a war.
But I’d rather be peaceful,
Or even sing soulful.
Go home to get a quick bite,
This time I might take the bike
Or the skates or scooter.
I really love things with a loud hooter.
I’ll make some cool music
And pretend to go loopy.
Or be an adult
That would be yuck!

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

I Wanna start out happy
All the family
Kids clean behind us 
or there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I like being me, can’t u see?
Cause I’m a kid, cause I’m a kid
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid!
I Love being me – can’t you see.
      I’m Free!
So listen please, listen to me.
N you and I will be complete!

 Written with Jamie Morgan

 
Mum’s The Word

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Irunjel: My mum’s always there 
Tries to help me understand.
N grows me up to be man.
Everyday should be mother’s day, her day, your day.
Put your feet up,
Have a massage.
I know for you it’s hard,
Kid’s, the job, house n lil rewards.
But, I’m gonna make you proud
Stand out in the crowd.
You’ve given me all I need,
So don’t worry now, please.
I chose the right one.
I got the very best mum.

(language)

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Tiga: Mother nature, creator.
They made us
And everything we see, 
Its all majk mother’s weave.
Protecting us,
Connecting us.
I need them kisses, how u hold me tight
N tell me I ‘m doing alright.
You listen n you feel my pain.
Mum, without you life ain’t the same.
But while we here together now,
For the finest job, please take a bow.

Cause the star to the show is……….

Mum!

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

(language)

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Irunjel:
Everyday your there
Every piece of you is shared.
What about you though
Where you wanna go?
Let’s spend some time,
I wanna see you really smile.
Taught me everything I know
How to wind down and take it slow,
Have fun, be playful while getting on with the show.

Tiga:
You only get one life
Live it wisely.
Treat people kind, you taught me.
Hold your head up high,
Always try hard,
Aim for the moon, at least you’ll land in the stars.
Be strong and loving.
Look after the land, family, 
culture and let that spirit dance.
Most importantly you taught me to take a stance.

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

(language)

Together: We look like our mum
Sound like our mum
We love you mum
The way you love us
The way your bringing us up
You’ve taken me everywhere 
I  even love fighting, 
the beach even shopping with you.
You’re the number girl in the world,
We’re the luckiest of all.
Put u # 1, whenever
Cause mum… you matter.

We walk together, read together, Talk together, swim together,
Ride together, drive together
I love our time together. 

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.
 
Written with Tiga & Irunjel

How Insane (that Gin Lane)

Alcohol bans, treaten us like children
Over this alien substance,
An introduced nuisance.
Governments might as well be an endorsee,
It’s legal cause of the money in it.
Rum Corps, bribes and slavery.
Here, that’s how it come to be.
But in London
For the peasants
Came an affordable drink,
Makin life for the poor gut renchin.
A lane for drunks and gins.
We got called the very same thing.
Babies hangin by there feet,
Mothers without teeth.
It’s a little different,
Just convenient
To label
The rebel.
All who drink 2 much turn to mongrel,
It’s not our way,
Drink it you say.
Make your pain go away.
But like the girls in gin lane,
Go insane.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

Ruining ourselves,
Fillin jail cells.
N wakin listenin to whats been done.
None of it fun.
It was me though
I don’t remember but I know.
Bit humiliating,
The self blaming.
Born on the hottest coals,
Just need a lil calm n self control.
We loose another day, week, year,
We’ll get sober.
Fixing livers
Start really livin.
But what else is there to choose
I mean instead of drinkin booze?
There ain’t many options,
I can only think of one.
To get back to our roots
All of our truths.
Find ourselves.
Lost is easier to control
But come on -not our, parkies, goomies or drones.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

We cant be lifer’s
Good liver – Good livin
Cant imprison ourselves
Lets fix the liver cells 
Feel alive
Thrive!

We cant be lifer’s
Good liver – Good livin
Cant imprison ourselves
Lets fix the liver cells 
Feel alive
Thrive!

Giving up can be empowering,
But goin need supporting.
Our old ways are here you know
From long time ago.
To stand up strong, in this land
Where we belong.
Reclaim our bodies,
Yeah be a little sorry
But it’s amazing
This thing covered in skin.
It can heal with love and kindness, like all of us, with niceness.
It’s the only solution –
Steps towards a health revolution.
Something different? Something new?
Or recycle the idea of goin back
On an original Aboriginal track?
With alcohol out of the equation
Lets go about undoing the effects – decolonisation.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

C That Star!

Dedicated to Yarraka Bayles on your 27th birthday.

Yarraka u’r a beaming star

You da mumma Luck, 
The aunty Yak.
With an unbelievable power,
For the family, like a tower, yet a flower.
My sister,
All that time together, 
Is what I really miss, 
It’s me n u sis.
Never alone now,
You keep me goin and glowin.
I never did enough,
When you were doin it tough,
Down on your luck.
Stupid, I was stuck!
As the years go by you know,
I’m letting go, 
Lettin my love show,
Mo n mo .
So let’s do this sis.
Let’s start some shi……

Chorus:
You C that star – that’s my sistar
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer now,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

When we step up,
With sisters like us,
People know to make a fuss!
We real!
Showin all the deal.
With mum beside us,
We here to have fun.
N we’ll always be there,
Lookin out for each other,
I’m by your side now, forever.

Cause Yarraka – your the brightest star!

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

With personality galore,
Since u were small.
Impressin with your dressin,
You have your own fashion.
Always mellow n yellow
But still letting me know.
Teachin me a lot, and
Not even aware of it.
We have to take a fall
We’ll get the right call.
U got the right stuff to be directin us,
Beautiful n tuff!
And for being there from day 1,
Through my tough spot,
Yarraka, I can’t thank you enough.

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer now,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

You’ve waled alone
But not no mo,
Your love is gold and tight, I’ll hold it.
Together runnin, 
Since we had no pants on.
Growing up dancing
Laughin now at the romancing.
Tryin to move the tribe along,
We gotta thank mum n dad, we strong!
No where we belong and
Never forget where we came from!

Youthful
Artistic
Realistic
Romantic with
Attitude
Kaiyu loves u, (watch her she’s) 
Aware (n truthful)

Be there for her now
Cause Yarraka you’re the star!

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer you know,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

So pretty and golden n
Plenty a breath you’ve stolen.
Yes a heart breaker,
But straight up and never a fake faker.
So I’d like to see you keep up
With Lili, Lala and they’re mum.
Names to look out for,
Gonna hear roars for one day
For the girls with a majikal ways.
Yeah, you’ll feel em commin from miles
Feel they’re smiles see the styles,
Of strong black women in the 21 century,
Watch these ones as they show us how it’s meant to be.

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer n Let go,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer n Let go,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly!

Aboriginal Spirituality: Interview with an Australian Aboriginal senior man

BY LYNDAFLOWER – MAY 30, 2011
POSTED IN: FREE MAGAZINE, SIDE BAR

Michael Williams gives an insight into the depth and richness of Aboriginal spirituality, estimated by some researchers to span 125,000 years. Aboriginal spirituality is based on an ancient cultural belief that life is a vast web of inter-connected relationships. Everything has meaning and purpose and everything is connected – the land, the people, the ancestors and the animals. The past is viewed as being inextricably linked to the present and throughout time the over riding spiritual value has been respect for Aboriginal cultural law.

What do you consider to be the most important aspects of Aboriginal spirituality?
Following your Law.  Don’t break Law.  Respecting all things, animate and inanimate in the entire natural world.

How do Aboriginal perceptions of spirituality differ from western interpretations?
A profound connectedness to land.  Living on your land is essential to maintaining the strongest possible links with land and ensuring proper practice of Aboriginal spiritual life.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about Aboriginal spirituality?
People try to make sense of it from their own perspective [spiritual] and do not often open themselves up to knowing it from the inside.  This is not unusual or surprising.  This is an ancient spirituality embedded in a culture that is acknowledged as being the longest continuously surviving culture in the entire world.  By the time the British and others arrived on Australian shores they had long-established behaviours relating to Indigenous cultures. With this entrenched behaviour, coupled with Christianity and Missionary zealousness, there was little chance of Aboriginal spirituality being assessed from a standpoint of respect and a desire to understand it on its own terms.

Is Aboriginal spirituality today different from what it was in the past, how has it changed (or not)?
The spirit has not changed. The Law lies in the land and the spirits of our ancestors have continued to inhabit the landscape during ancient times, during periods of colonisation and after our peoples have been removed from their lands.  Human engagement with Aboriginal spirituality is now challenged by the intervention of other spiritual and religious beliefs and doctrines, as well as the demands of a world filled with technology that infiltrates every corner of human existence.  It is now increasingly hard, except for the committed individual, to stay true to the old ways.  Moving in and out of vastly different domains requires discipline of a high order, but many do so by staying on Land.

What lessons can us ‘white folk’ learn from Aboriginal spirituality?
Simply be. Respectful attention to a commitment to a spiritual path will bring what is meant to be.  Don’t have expectations.  If it is meant to come your way – it will.  Stay on task.  The spiritual domain and practices of the longest continuously surviving culture in the world must have something to offer humanity.  Limit the overlay of other spiritual traditions and try to let Aboriginal ways stand for themselves.

What have been the most important spiritual lessons you have learnt as an Aboriginal man?
Never doubt the presence of spirit and the ability of old ones who have passed to be there for you.  Ask and they will come and ‘show’ themselves in some way.  The land is alive with the spirits and presence of our ancestors and creation heroes.

What works best for you/what do you do when you need some spiritual upliftment?
Go to my Homeland – visit my traditional lands. I engage with my old ones every day and ask for their guidance.

In your 30 years of university teaching, were there any spiritual (or other) changes you noticed in students undertaking Aboriginal studies?
Students have always been interested in Aboriginal spirituality. There are two issues to consider here.  Most students who choose to take a course in Aboriginal studies are already interested in all matters regarding Aboriginal culture and are thirsting for knowledge.  Then there are students who are required to take courses in Aboriginal culture as part of their degree and sometimes these students are resistant to the content raised in these courses. In my experience, the vast majority of students who showed some resistance at first end up thoroughly enjoying the course and go on to take other Aboriginal studies  courses as electives.

From all your years of experience, what spiritual advice would you pass on to others?
Never doubt the existence of spirit and of a Creator – however you may wish to term it.  Spend time regularly [daily] pondering the importance of a spiritual approach to life and take time to care for others and all things.  Respect Planet Earth and the Universe.

Where do you see (or hope to see) Aboriginal spirituality heading in the future?
It is here, always has been here and remains.  The spirit never leaves the land.  People leave the land.  In my experience the spirit presence in my traditional homeland has become more overt since my mother died and there has not been anyone living there permanently.  I notice them when I visit.  It demands that I establish a more active presence there.

Michael Williams:  Australian Aboriginal senior man

Michael Williams was born into the Goorang Goorang peoples of the South East Queensland area.  He has had a long career in public life, mainly in the tertiary education sector, and has recently retired as Director of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit at the University of Queensland after almost 20 years.  He is currently working independently as a consultant and holds an honorary position as an Adjunct Professor in the School of Social Science at the University of Queensland where he continues his research interests.  He is also a long serving member of the Council of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in Canberra.

Michael has maintained a strong interest in the cultural and spiritual life of his people throughout his life, from spending hours listening to stories as a child through to his continuing interest as an adult in researching family history with his nuclear and extended families. This research has led him (at the age of 50) to being accepted into Aboriginal Law/Lore in the Central Desert region of Australia where he follows ceremonial and cultural life through several annual visits.

Source: http://spiritualspace.com.au/aboriginal-spirituality/

Spiritual space magazine is new from Brisbane.

10 Essential Life Skills

There are universal principles that govern our universe.
Metaphysics is the study of these.

The School of Metaphysics is a place to discover, explore, and put these principles into action so you can live the life worth examining, your best life.

Coursework, seminars, media, and intuitive research provide the mental technology for developing your whole Self.

Start upgrading your Spiritual DNA now.

Have you ever wondered how some human beings seem to develop their potential to become a powerful influence in the world?  What inspires a Martin Luther King, Jr. to broadcast a vision so clear it lasts generations beyond him?  What gives a Mahatma Gandhi the courage to hold true to his ideals amidst great adversity?  What enables an Albert Schweitzer to transform his life and career and devote his life to humanitarian service?  Where does a Mother Teresa acquire the determination to give and give with complete surrender to a higher calling? 

These great men and women throughout history tapped the hidden powers of the mind.  Scientists report that the average person draws upon only ten to twenty percent of his or her brain power.  The remainder lies dormant until we learn how to develop and strive toward our full potential.  We believe that any thinker can come into his own greatness by increasing his knowledge, exercising mental discipline, and generating insightful discoveries that can be employed to improve his own life, and sometimes aid all of humanity.  (from School of Metaphysics Student Guide)

We can greatly increase our ability to be powerful, intelligent, creative, and expressive by learning how to access reasoning and intuition.  These are two of the ten essential life skills taught in the School of Metaphysics course of study.  These skills are:

SELF RESPECT – Everything begins and ends with you.  When you can view yourself from different perspectives, you develop a greater awareness of who you are and how to become the person you desire to be.  Knowing how you cause everything in your life gives you the great power of knowing how to change.

Undivided Attention – Attention is one of our greatest commodities!  You can learn to put your whole self into whatever you doing.  You can learn to be here now to reap the beauty and fullness of each moment.  Your relationships will improve, you will be a better employee or employer, and you will be a great influence on your children when you give your undivided attention. 

Concentration- Holding your attention where you want it for as long as you desire makes you powerful, effective, and efficient.  A high degree of concentration is one of the secrets to success in the business world, the field of education, for artists and musicians, and for anyone who wants to understand commitment.  Concentration is a skill that can be built with exercise and practice! 

Memory – You can also build the skill of drawing out of your brain what you have stored there, at will.  Undivided attention and concentration build the memory power.  The ability to strengthen memory saves time, produces relaxation, and helps you to learn from the past so that you can live a better present.

Listening – Everyone loves to be heard.  When you cultivate the ability to listen to your inner self through meditation, you can be s still-minded, calming presence for others.  Listening to your inner self enables you to listen to other people.  Good listeners are great marriage partners, wonderful parents, sought-after employees, excellent employers, compassionate friends, and wise counselors. 

Imagination- This is a skill that distinguishes the exceptional person from the average one.  Imagination gives you the ability to improve your self and your life and to create new ways of being.  Every great discovery in our world was made by someone who could imagine a better way!

Reasoning- Reasoning skill is built through developing memory, attention, and imagination.  Learning to discern cause is a function of reasoning.  A good reasoner can learn from any experience, can produce growth and understanding, and is able to become healthy, wealthy, and wise.

Intuition-True intuition is the direct grasp of truth.  It is the ability to draw from the subconscious store of understanding and wisdom, the “teaching from within.”  Intuition can be cultivated and developed for better decision-making, for understanding dreams, for drawing upon abilities like clairvoyance and telepathy. 

Breath – Most people don’t think of breath as a function of the mind.  Conscious breathing is the ability to give and receive energy.  We can learn to be more balanced, more energized, more relaxed, and to become aware of the Self that exists beyond the physical body. 

Entrainment – Coordinating the head and the heart we become a Whole Self.  We experience the truth that we are all connected with one another energetically, as we realize the connection of our outer, physical self with the inner, spiritual self.  If you have ever had a “peak experience,” you’ve been entrained.  You can cause this state of consciousness on a regular basis with the practice of mental discipline.

Source: http://som.org/NewPages/Newsite07/SOMNavigation/Purpose.html

Mental illness or spiritual illness: what should we call it?

Dr Ross Ingram Memorial Competition Winner

Mental illness or spiritual illness: what should we call it?

Lindy L Moffatt
MJA 2011; 194 (10): 541-542
With permission from my son I am able to tell this story. I have not used his name for privacy reasons.

I would like to dedicate this essay to the many Indigenous people who have passed away in psychiatric hospitals and did not make it home to their families and communities.

“Historical trauma” is defined as the subjective experiencing and remembering of events in the mind of an individual or the life of a community, passed from adults to children in cyclic processes as “collective emotional and psychological injury . . . over the life span and across generations”.1

Iwas raised in a foster family from the age of two, in suburban Brisbane, Queensland, with three of my siblings. I am a proud Aboriginal woman with close family ties across south-east Queensland and the north coast of New South Wales. My mother is from the Wakka Wakka clan group in Cherbourg and Brisbane. My father is from the Gumbaynggir and Dunghutti communities of the north-coast region of New South Wales.

Recently, I arrived in Canberra from Brisbane with my son to take up a Research Fellowship with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. My research is on the question of “Mental health: what treatment options are working for Indigenous peoples?”. I have chosen this topic because of my personal experience as a mother.

The day before we left our home in Margate, a suburb in the north of Brisbane on Moreton Bay, to travel to Canberra, we attended my son’s mental health review tribunal hearing, an event that was life-changing for both of us. My son has suffered from a mental illness (schizophrenia) for many years, which saw him hospitalised for ten-and-a-half years. During this time he was on a forensic order as an involuntary patient, because of crimes he had committed while being unwell. I was expecting to be seeking the tribunal’s permission to take my son interstate for the three months that I would be working. Instead, to our surprise, his forensic order was revoked, meaning he was able to leave Queensland and live wherever he wanted. Overwhelmed by the decision, my son kept repeatedly asking the tribunal panel what it meant for him.

As a mother I have struggled, mostly because I was only seventeen years old when my son was born. Of course, you can never imagine or prepare yourself for the way life can take such a turn some twenty years later. I had lived with my biological mother on and off since I was fifteen, so she took on significant caring responsibilities for my baby, who was her first grandchild. She was very close to him. My mother had also suffered from “mental illness” as a young woman and had been hospitalised (I don’t know how many times). I remember being told about it in quite a negative way. Mum was admitted to what was the “old” Wolston Park Hospital some forty years ago. This hospital was located on the same grounds as the hospital called The Park, Centre for Mental Health, where my son has spent his years. She had grown up in Cherbourg Aboriginal community in Queensland where she spent some of her childhood in the dormitory while her mother travelled away for work. I know she did not have good memories of the dormitory days, as she later shared some stories with me about the abuse that she witnessed and was subjected to in the dormitory. My mother died at the age of fifty-seven from kidney failure caused by diabetes, when my son was only twelve.

What I have read and come to understand about transgenerational trauma within Indigenous communities is that the suffering of individuals and communities from trauma and pain results in many unresolved issues not just for those immediately affected, but for those around them, their families and their descendants, and from what I know about my family history the trauma reaches much further than my mother. Personal experience has left me with no doubt that transgenerational trauma contributed to the mental/spiritual unwellness of both my mother and my son.

After my mother’s death our lives changed dramatically. I was in deep grief. It was difficult to “be there” emotionally, or in any other way, for my son. I felt vulnerable and extremely fragile. The grief was unbearable. It took me to a place that I found hard to come back from, to the point where I thought that I would die from it. At the time part of me wanted to. Fortunately, I did come back, just as my son was about to travel down his own road of self-destruction, which began with bizarre behaviour patterns. At about age fourteen, he started to use drugs — first marijuana, then amphetamines, known on the street as speed.

This is a parent’s nightmare. Drug taking was not something I had experience with, nor did I expect this to be happening to my child. What followed was years of risky behaviour, crime, eventually juvenile detention and then prison! As a mother, the pain of this is beyond imagination: it reaches into the very core of you. When your child is locked away, you are too. I was overcome with feelings of shame and guilt. I felt emotionally, psychologically and spiritually immobilised and trapped within myself. Of course, eventually it took its toll on my mental and physical health, and I was diagnosed with my own life-threatening illnesses. One of the many challenges was dealing with blame from people who were close to me. Some made conscious and unconscious hurtful comments because of their own pain and lack of understanding of my son’s illness.

We also experienced discrimination arising from the general community’s ignorance of mental illness. When going out in public — going shopping, for instance — people would stare, laugh or make comments.

The effects of this trauma are still with me today.

In prison, my son’s mental illness started to become very obvious, through the signs of self-harm, and symptoms of mental unwellness such as crying and responding to voices. Eventually, he was hospitalised and I visited him regularly, took him on leave many times and had him living with me for short periods. Unfortunately, he was so unwell that he would abscond from the hospital, and would run away from me as well. This caused immense anxiety, not only for me and our family and friends, but also for staff at the hospital who were genuinely concerned about his welfare. My son would go missing for days, sometimes weeks, without his medication. The police were, of course, alerted and it was their responsibility to find him, but I would usually locate him before they did, and would then seek help from the Indigenous workers or nurses to return him safely to hospital. This happened on many occasions.

Throughout these years of experience with my son and his illness, there were many moments when I questioned my own thoughts and feelings. I did know, however, that I was experiencing something that was deeply spiritual and unknown. My son’s thin and pale, ghost-like appearance haunted me, and I could feel him detaching from what was real. That is why it was important for me to be around to keep the strong spiritual and emotional bond between us — I knew from a sickening feeling inside me there was a very real risk of losing him through suicide. He was haunted by voices, and would respond by talking to people that he believed were real. Sometimes he was happy and laughing along with them; other times he would be screaming back at them to leave him alone, and would cry in a very mournful way that made me cry as well. I remember all this very vividly, especially the times at night when I would lie awake listening to him talking in another language which I knew to be an Aboriginal language. This did freak me out a little, as he appeared to be having conversations and speaking the language fluently. I thought that I was imagining what I had heard until family members and workers at the hospital told me that they had witnessed him doing the same thing. It was through this experience that I came to know and believe that Indigenous mental illness is also spiritual illness, as it is deeply connected to our spirituality and cultural beliefs. I also believe that this spiritual connection is what helped my son get through his illness to where he is today. A quote from the Schizophrenia Fellowship of NSW newsletter has been helpful in supporting my thoughts around mental–spiritual illness.

Wellbeing is an holistic and collective issue, with specific individual health problems being of little relevance if not considered as part of wider social, spiritual and community health . . . Mental illness or disturbance may be seen as a ‘soreness of the spirit’ caused by loss of social and family networks, destruction of kinship and family, dislocation from ancestral lands and the conflict between tradition and the pressures of trying to exist within and alongside European culture.2

On one very memorable visit to the hospital I sat with the treating psychiatrist to discuss my son’s “progress”. She explained to me that there were “two very sick patients in the hospital at the time, [my son] being one of them”, and that “out of the two, he [was] the most unwell”. In a roundabout way, I guess she was trying to tell me that my son was the sickest patient in the hospital at that moment. To this day I don’t remember how I drove myself home.

During his long hospital stay of over ten years, my son lost elders and friends, mostly Indigenous patients, who passed away in hospital. He dealt with this in his own way, showing courage and strength. The thought was always at the back of my mind that he himself would not survive. I questioned myself all the time as to whether I was in denial of the possibility that he would be institutionalised forever, but remained convinced that it was important to rise above this thinking, and to try to stay positive, and most of all to believe that things can change and be different. My son is now very well, the best he could possibly be. He lives with me full-time and is actively seeking employment.

I have presented at workshops on mental illness in Indigenous communities and received positive responses from people who appreciated honesty and openness in talking about this sensitive area. There is definitely a need for more understanding and education in our communities so people can come together to share and talk openly without any shame or blame. I always tell people that talking about it and seeking help can mean the difference between life or death for a loved one. Through the years, I have always felt very strongly that “someone” was around, guiding me through this time in our lives. I listened to the messages and acted intuitively, particularly when my son was at his most critical times of illness, and the times when he went missing from the hospital. I give many thanks to all the people who were there supporting us on this long journey, such as family, friends, hospital staff and community, who gave us hope and encouragement. If it weren’t for them, I know we would not be here today to tell this story.

This story is difficult to tell because I know that I will be revisiting the trauma, reliving the memories of events that took place, and visualising the images that will forever haunt me. With permission from my son, I wanted to document and share this story in the hope that it may give strength and support to some other family who is going through the same or similar circumstances.

Author details
Lindy L Moffatt, DipCommWelfareWork&Counselling, Indigenous Visiting Research Fellow
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, ACT.
Correspondence: Lindy.MoffattATaiatsis.gov.au
References
Atkinson J, Nelson J, Atkinson C. Trauma, transgenerational transfer and effects on community wellbeing. In: Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice. Purdie N, Dudgeon P, Walker R, editors. Canberra: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 2010: 138. http://www.health.act.gov.au/c/health?a=sendfile&ft=p&fid=1708785562&sid= (accessed Apr 2011).
Schizophrenia Fellowship of NSW Inc. Quality of life. Indigenous: mental illness as understood in Aboriginal communities. 2008. http://www.sfnsw.org.au/About-Mental-Illness/Quality-of-Life/Indigenous/default.aspx (accessed Apr 2011).
(Received 4 Apr 2011, accepted 19 Apr 2011)

Source: http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/194_10_160511/mof10395_fm.html

A comparason between Native Title & Land Rights

at last!!!
 
a good comparison of what is land rights and what is the more insultingly and falsely called native title.
 
as gary foley and others have said for many years, ‘native title is not land rights’. it does not even come close to real land rights for the traditional owners of our ancient lands.
 
the major difficulties of comparing the two systems was that mainly it became very very difficult to explain the differences to those who had a limited legal knowledge and/or a more limited understanding of land for the traditional owners. there was a new-age primitivism that clouded many enquiring minds but that eventually brought many conversations to an inconclusive  close. 
 
the gove case 1972 and heard by j. blackburn found that land rights did not exist when it came to mining claims. then pm billy mcmahon strongly put to parliament that land rights would never exist, hence our tent embassy was formed. whitlam, not satisfied with that outcome then set up the woodward royal commission to look at land rights in the nt. his findings were given to whitlam but the cia-arranged dismissal of whitlam then  allowed fraser, much to his credit, to bring the nt act in. john howard spoke quite strongly against the act being brought in but fraser, quite correctly, ignored his racist and rancid statements  and proceeded. howard never forgave him and i believe howard’s later venal and personal actions led him to grab back the lands of the nt. among other reasons too, of course.
 
mabo 1992 found for the meriam torres strait islanders and this had a flow-on effect to the mainland land claims. then came the wik people win  in 1996 that found that traditional land owners did not lose their lands to pastoralists and others. howard and his minions were now in power and they went ballistic with the high court decision. the coalition government decided then that the high court could no longer be trusted to continue to back the invaders as they had done so for nearly a hundred years. howard and tim fischer then came up with the infamous and racist 10 point plan to allow for, as they put it, ‘buckets of extinguishment’ against tha aboriginal traditional owners.
 
with some little change the bill made its way to the senate whereby, because of the then numbers, the final decision was to be made by senator brian harridine and he called on father frank brennan to assist him. two non-aboriginal men, steeped in white christianity, were charged with either rejecting the bill in toto or in attempting to amend the bill by cutting the bill off at its knees. we were calling for complete rejection but our voices would not be heard.
 
harridine and brennan decided to not consult with those aborigines, including noel pearson who referred to the coalition government as ‘racist scum’, because they did not want a ‘racist election.’ the 10 point plan became the 6 point plan to stop racist elections! these two men have cost aborigines dearly since those days and they continue still to do so. what they did not seem to understand is that for my people, every bloody election is a racist event. especially in the rural areas where land claims are before the tribunal.
 
governments around the country listened and learned well on how to win on every land claim that came before them, and that was to keep the cases out of the courts and set up negotiating bodies that they could quite easily control. real land rights has been reduced to indigenous land use agreements that now only allow for negotiated agreements that only allows for cultural access but with no ownership of the land or its resources.
 
we badly need to return to the land rights as a proper human rights procedure. the krudd and gillard governments are more than prepared to continue to steal our birthrights from us. the yorta yorta land claim was naught but a travesty of justice, as so many others have also been. the court found against their cultural continuance on their lands, a complete travesty of natural justice, and then the victorian government of the time recognised enough of their cultural continuance to do a negotiated theft of their lands.
 
strane thing, white justice. we are never ever allowed to win.
 
we want rights, not some smoke-and-mirrors theft of what is ours and has been gor more than 60 000 years.
 
always was, always will be – aboriginal land.
 

To see comparison document: http://65.55.40.151/att/GetAttachment.aspx?file=028e68d7-f4b4-48f0-9687-12f591f6b75d.pdf&ct=YXBwbGljYXRpb24vcGRm&name=Y29tcGFyaXNvbi5wZGY_3d&inline=0&rfc=0&empty=False&imgsrc=&hm__login=kaiyumoura&hm__domain=hotmail.com&ip=10.12.156.8&d=d6255&mf=0&hm__ts=Tue%2c%2014%20Jun%202011%2005%3a40%3a34%20GMT&st=kaiyumoura&hm__ha=01_f42da2bc57ea7c52649be71a9dd2ce4ff026c971140fab207ddd7e63e6ec130d&oneredir=1

http://www.clc.org.au

fkj  
 
ray jackson
president
indigenous social justice association

Appearances and ‘real’ people.

From The Ring Cedars.. From Illusory People chapter.

Anastasias grandfather says in response to Vladamirs statement whilst pointing at two girls in the park talking.  “I think one of them – the one smoking – is unreal.”  And later says “look closely. The girl has on very uncomfortable high healed shoes. Besides, there a little too tight for her.  She wears them precisely because someone else is dictating what shoes women should be wearing these days. And she’s wearing a short skirt of material made to look like leather but it isn’t leather.  It’s harmful for the body, but she’s wearing it according to the dictates of society’s current fad. Look at all her gaudy make-up and how arrogantly she is behaving.  Outwardly she is independant.  But only outwardly.  Her whole appearance is at odds with her self, her real self.  She’s been ‘smitten’ by an image of someone elses thoughtforms, a soulless, illusory image has eclipsed her living soul and taken it captive.” it takes a strange twist when asked to prove if this  is true.  Grandfather approaced the two girls, looked the one smoking in eye n said “put the cigarette, dear girl, into your right hand. You should try holding it in your right hand.” she obediently obliged. But it was more to it than that.  Her face suddenly became completely altered.  Her arrogance had vanished.  In fact, everything about her was differen: her face, the way she stood.  And in a completely different tone she said: “I’l try grandfather.” “You should have your child, dear girl.” “it’ll be hard for me.  I’m all alone.”. “let him come to you. You go and think about that hand of yours, think about your child, and he will come.  Go along now dear girl, you must hurry”. Vladamir says after this “can you tame any woman like that? That’s terrific! Some sort of super-hypnosis, eh? Far out!” to which the Grandfather replies ” it’s not hypnosis.  And theres no far out mysticism here.  It’s simply an attentive attitude to ones fellow man.  And i mean to the man, not the dreamt up image which obscures the real man.  And, man responds instantly to this, he finds his strength, when you appeal directly to him, ignoring the illusory image.” “But how did you manage to see the invisible man behind the visible image?” “It’s all very simple, really. I watched them a bit.  The girl was holding the cigarette in her left hand.  She was also rummaging around in her hand with her left hand. Which means she’s left handed.  And if a small child holds a spoon or does something else with the left hand, his parents try to get him to use the right.  She got along fine with her parents.  I realised this when i saw the way she looked at the man and woman walking along with a little girl in tow.  I spoke to her the way her parents might have when she was little.  I tried to use the same tone of voice her parents might have used.  Back when she was little, unaffected, not under someone else’s image.  That little girl was the real man, and it responded rite off.  And it’s the alien image doesn’t want the child. But the girl’s inner being wants the child very much. They’re struggling with each other.  Now her inner being will win out!!!”

I just found this last night in my favourite series, hope u like it. I could never find the words n now i hav, so i had to share.

The Myall Creek Massacre

There have been many massacres and slaughter of Aborigines that have gone unrecorded in Australian history, but the Myall Creek Massacre, stands out, as the only one of its type, where the perpetrators were punished for the crimes against Aborigines.

On the 10th June 1838, twelve armed stockman rode onto Henry Dangar’s property at Myall Creek in Northern NSW, near Bingara, and rounded up, like animals, twenty eight friendly Aboriginal, elderly men, women and children. These were the relatives of the Aboriginal men who were working with the station manager, William Hobbs.

The twelve stockmen then dragged the Aborigines into the bush and slaughtered every last one. Their bodies were then burnt. The cowardly attack on the elderly Aboriginal men, women and children was well planned.

When William Hobbs returned and discovered the attack, he immediately began his own investigation into the atrocity. He went to the site of the massacre, questioned other employees of the station and let it be known that he intended to report the matter to his employer, Henry Dangar, as well as the authorities.

On the 24th June, Frederick I. Foot, a landholder, travelled to Muswellbrook to report the incident. On arrival at Muswellbrook, Foot discovered he had missed the police magistrate so decided to travel onto Sydney to report the incident there. On the 4th July, Foot wrote an account of the incident for the attention of Governor Gipps.

Governor Gipps ordered an investigation into the incident with the view to prosecution. There was a great deal of antagonism against the Government for this decision.

Unfortunately, colonial Australia was extremely racist and Victorian in their thinking and treated Aborigines as pests, and animals to be exterminated. Later, when the perpetrators were put on trial, one juror was quoted in the Australian Newspaper as saying,” I look on the blacks as a sort of monkey and the sooner they are exterminated from the face of the earth, the better. I knew the men were guilty but I would never see a white man hanged for killing a black.”

The hanging of the Myall Creek murderers caused great outrage in Sydney, but there were many colonists that were outraged at the massacre of Aboriginal people, but unfortunately, those colonists were the minority!

One hundred and sixty two years after the massacre, a memorial to the Wirrayaraay Aborigines of Myall Creek was dedicated on the 10th June 2000. An annual memorial service has been held on 10th June, at the site of the massacre, ever since. Colin Isaacs is the artist who painted the original artwork from which the engravings on the seven plaques along the memorial walkway of the Myall Creek Memorial were made.

 Other Myall Creek web pages and sites:

Myall Creek

Myall Creek Massacre and Memorial Site, New South Wales
Friends of Myall Creek

The Myall Creek Massacre, 1838
 

Remembering The Myall Creek Massacre

Teacher Plan for Myall Creek Lesson

Papers on the Myall Creek Massacre 1964-1979 [manuscript]/cLeonard L. Payne

Indigenous Law Bulletin 

Aborigines; Australia: History; Parliament House: Sydney
 
Source:http://www.newagemultimedia.com/isaacs/MyallCrk.html

 

The Language from the Hunter River and Lake Macquarie (HRLM)

People

The Language from the Hunter River and Lake Macquarie (HRLM) was spoken by the people now known as Awabakal, Wonnarua, Kuringgai, and most likely Geawegal. Geawegal and Wonnarua share section names with Darkinyung and Gamilaraay.

Traditional Country

While it is impossible to put precise boundaries on language groups, we can speak generally. This language was spoken from Brisbane Waters in the south to Newcastle in the north, and extending west to Singleton and as far as Muswellbrook. It is likely that there were dialectal differences within such a large region.

Language Details

HRLM belongs to the Pama-Nyungan family of Australia languages. It is one of 35 languages once spoken in the area now known as NSW. HRLM has a rich collection of historical sources, the most important being the grammar and wordlist published by Threlkeld in 1834. During the 1800s Aboriginal peoples across NSW bore the brunt of European invasion, and their languages were an early casualty, with the active suppression of languages and the emergence of English as a common language between the different language groups. HRLM was the first Aboriginal language to be formally taught to a non-Aboriginal person, by Biraban, also known by his English name of John McGill, to the Rev. Lancelot Threlkeld, a missionary at Lake Macquarie, between 1824 and 1850. Biraban’s teachings form the basis of the grammar published by Muurrbay in 2006. Threlkeld called the language by its location name, so we continue this practice.

Biraban* 
Biraban’s keen understanding of language structure enabled him to teach his own language to Threlkeld, and to assist with interpreting in court cases involving Aboriginal people. He learnt English whilst working as a servant to Captain M. Gill at the military barracks in Sydney and also served as a tracker of escaped convicts. A more detailed description can be found here

Reverend Threlkeld^

Alternative spellings and names include:
Awaba, Awabagal, Kuringgai, Karikal, Minyowa, Minyowie, Kuri, Wonnuaruah, Wannerawa, Wonarua, Wonnah Kuah, Wonnarua, Wanarruwa, Kayawaykal, Keawekal, Geawagal, Weawe-gal, Garewegal.

Language Outline

HRLM is characterised by having:

Three vowels: i, a and u, each of which can also be pronounced as a longer vowel (although it is not known if vowel length is contrastive) and 13 consonants. The writing system developed for HRLM includes voiceless stops and the palatal pronunciations of the laminal stop and nasal: p, t, tj, k, m, n, ny, ng, r, rr, l, w and y.
A rich system of noun suffixing (tag endings) to mark the grammatical roles of subject, object and agent. Other suffixes indicate instrument, location, movement towards, movement from, cause, via, with, like, for etc.
The pronouns have singular, dual and plural number, nine cases and the singular pronouns also have bound forms.
Verbs have three tenses: present, past and future. Other suffixes convey different meanings, such as permit, want, make, each other, self, lest, for, etc.
Sentences have free word order, although there is a tendency towards agent – object – verb in a transitive sentence, unless there is focus on a non-agent participant.
Language Resources

The main published texts are:
Threlkeld, LE 1834, An Australian Grammar comprehending the principles and natural rules of the language, as spoken by the Aborigines, in the vicinity of Hunter’s River, Lake Macquarie, &c. New South Wales. Sydney: Stephens and Stokes, Herald Office.

Lissarrague, A 2006, A Salvage Grammar of the language from the Hunter River and Lake Macquarie. Nambucca Heads: Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative.

Written examples of the language

Minyaringpi nyakilin?
What are you looking at?

Anipu puwantuwa Patty amuwangkinpa.
This is Patty with me.

Wiya nyura uwanan Mulapinpakulang?
Will you all go to Newcastle?

Minyaring kanpi wiyan?
What do you say?

Minyaynpin wanay?
How many children do you have?

Wanang-pi manan, ani, anuwa?
Which will you take, this one, that one?

Wiya pali uwanan? Wantja? Sydneykulang!
Shall we go? Where? To Sydney!

from-
http://www.muurrbay.org.au/awabakal_wonnarua.html

Bi lingual learning NT petition

tuesday, december 16, 2008

Bi lingual learning NT – Please sign and distribute
Published date: 3/12/08

Petition For Bi-lingual Learning

TO THE HONORABLE THE SPEAKER AND MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

This petition of citizens from Australia and overseas, both Indigenous
and non-Indigenous, draws the attention of the House to the announcement on October 14th 2008 by the NT Government that from 2009 the ten remaining bilingual programs in the Northern Territory would be effectively closed down.

We believe that:
• The NT Government’s decision is educationally unsound, and that it will
hinder, rather than help, the children’s chances of learning good English. It goes against the strong evidence that using a child’s first language fosters greater cognitive development and proficiency in learning through all curriculum areas.

• The decision is demoralising for Indigenous communities who have put
effort into promoting and developing teaching methodologies that suit
bilingual and bicultural Indigenous children. Our NT bilingual and bicultural programs have provided real jobs, real work and real incentives for Indigenous educators to train and work in these schools.

• The decision will prejudice the survival of Indigenous languages. The use of the child’s first language also fosters pride in the students’ self esteem and Indigenous identity as recognised in the “Little Children are Sacred” Report.

• The decision goes against the recognition by the United Nations of
the right of Indigenous people to provide education in their own languages.

We therefore ask the House to:

Ratify the UN Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and in particular to direct the NT Government to comply with Article 14 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Article 14.1:

Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.

Signed:

Name:

Date:

Principal Petitioners:
Names: Kathryn McMahon and Yalmay Yunupingu
Address: 58 Tiwi Gardens Road, Tiwi, Darwin. NT 0810
Email: galiyan@yahoo.co.uk

Eleven Facts about NT Bilingual Schools

FACT 1: Bilingual schools teach English and an Australian Indigenous language
Literacy in the ‘mother-tongue’ is taught while a child is learning to hear and understand English. Over the 12 years of schooling about 70% of teaching will be in English.

FACT 2: A small percentage of Indigenous students attend bilingual school
16% of remote Indigenous students (7.8% of all students) attend nine bilingual schools. The remaining 84% of remote Indigenous students do not attend bilingual schools.

FACT 3: Bilingual schools out perform non-bilingual schools
Previous NT studies in the 1980s and 90s have shown that bilingual schools out perform non-bilingual schools in key English literacy and numeracy areas. See Fact 3.1 references on page 2.
Both national and international studies strongly indicate that teaching literacy in the mother tongue is the better way to support the development of English literacy. See Fact 3.2 references on page 2.

FACT 4: No evidence against bilingual schooling
There has never been a formal independent published report showing that bilingual programs have been anything but successful.

FACT 5: Bilingual program achievements were noted
The achievements of bilingual schooling were noted in the Department’s Indigenous Languages and Culture Report.
See Fact 5 reference on page 2.

FACT 6: Bilingual schools produce more Year 12 or NTCE graduates
Of the 31 Year 12 graduates in 2007, 70% came from bilingual schools. This means that a student is almost 9 times more likely to graduate from Year 12 if they come from a bilingual school. See: NTDET 2006 Poster: You Can Do It.

FACT 7: More teacher graduates from bilingual schools
There are more teacher graduates from bilingual schools than non bilingual schools. Up to 1998, 75% of all graduates (Ass Dip and Dip Teaching) from BIITE came from bilingual schools, or up to 1998 a graduate teacher was about 20 times more likely to come from a bilingual school. See comment on page 2.

FACT 8: Indigenous ESL students have double the student/teacher ratio as migrant ESL students. Migrant children from non-English speaking backgrounds attend intensive English classes with a teacher/student ratio of 1 to 10. Indigenous students with low or no English proficiency attend classes with a teacher/student ratio of 1 to 22.

FACT 9: Labour’s broken election promise on Universal Human Rights
Labour has forgotten its 2007 election promise to honour Australia’s commitments to the Universal Human Rights
Declaration, to which Australian became a signatory in 1948. See Fact 9 reference on page 2.

FACT 10: Labour’s broken promise to endorse the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights
Labour’s pre-election (2007) platform endorsing the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights Article 14 (below) has been
ignored. See Fact 10 reference on page 2.

Fact 11: Labour ignores Australia’s obligations under UN Convention of the Rights of Child 1989
Australia’s obligations under this convention talk about discrimination on the basis of language, ethnicity andidentity. See Fact 11 reference on page 2.
Page 2 15/12/2008 Email comments to: john.greatorex@cdu.edu.au
Eleven Facts about NT Bilingual Schools – References

FACT 3.1 references:
3.1.1 Devlin, B. (1995). The evaluation of bilingual programs in the Northern Territory, 1973–1993. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 113, 25-41.
3.1.2 Christie, M., Gale, K., McClay, D., and Harris, S., (1981) Academic achievement in the Milingimbi bilingual education program TESOL Quarterly, 297-314

FACT 3.2 references:
3.2.1 Greene, J. (1998). A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of bilingual education.[WWW document.] Retrieved
December 4, 2008 from http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/JWCRAWFORD/greene.htm
3.2.2 Meyer, M. & Fienberg, S. (Eds.) (1992). Case of bilingual education strategies. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
3.2.3 Ramirez, J.D. (1992). Executive summary of longitudinal study of structured English immersion strategy, early exit and late exit transitional bilingual education programs for language minority children. Bilingual
Research Journal, 16 (1&2), 1-61.
3.2.4 Willig, A. (1985). A meta-analysis of selected studies on the effectiveness of bilingual education. Review of Educational Research, 55, 269-317.

FACT 5 reference:
NT DEET (2005) The Indigenous languages and culture in NT schools report (2004- 2005). Pages 35-37, Retrieved
December 4, 2008 from:
http://www.det.nt.gov.au/education/indigenous_education/previous_publications/indigenous_languages_culture_rep
ort/

FACT 7 comment:
Up to 1998 there were more bilingual schools, but as 3 out of every 4 teacher graduates came from a small number of bilingual schools (which in 2008 represents 16% of Indigenous students), then calculations show that up to 1998, a graduate teacher was approximately 20 times more likely to come from a bilingual school.

FACT 9 reference:
Universal Human Rights Declaration:
Article 26.
(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

FACT 10 reference:
UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights
Article 14:
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providingeducation in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.
Article 15
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations which shall be appropriately reflected in education and public information.
2. States shall take effective measures, in consultation and cooperation with the indigenous peoples concerned, to combat prejudice and eliminate discrimination and to promote tolerance, understanding and good relations among indigenous peoples and all other segments of society.

Fact 11 reference:
Convention on the Rights of the Child
Article 29.1
“… education of the child shall be directed to (c) the development of respect for the child’s parents, his or her own cultural identity, language and values, for the national values of the country in which the child is living, the country from which he or she may originate and for civilizations different from his or her own …”

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A little about page admin Kaiyu Moura (Bayles)

Now living in QLD raising her children on their traditional country, gathering food, learning the old art of building shelters, dance and the local language. For the past 20 years with her late Grandmother Maureen Watson and a dance group with 6 of her sisters Kaiyu travelled schools, festivals, events etc sharing the beauty of First Nations Culture through song and dance, stories, art, theatre, nursery rhymes, poetry etc and engaging all ages in different projects that inspire positive change. Also a poet, documentary maker, songwriter, artist, event organiser, media consultant, testing the waters of micro social enterprise by starting her own tshirt and sublimation printing business and with her own label, Kaiyu creates what she calls Freedom Threads.

After building their own home on Tribal Sovereign land, Kaiyu is now homeschooling and teaching the kids about making our own tinctures, learning about bushtucker and mushrooms, growing food, building with aircrete, setting up wind turbines, composting toilets and ram water pumps... Really learning what it truly means to thrive. This is our Group where we share alot of what we do

Kaiyu and the Tribe