My poetry n lyrics, feedback n sharing welcome

My poems 

All My poems 

Prayer From Me An Australian Aborigine….

Goodmornin World and those of us on the other side,
What another beautiful day,
The earth, the water and the sky,
as it was in the beginning of time.
The children of ancestors, 
so strong and wise, 
we still learning bout peaces prize,
Please keep us from pain and resentment, 
Our children smiling
And our old people contented
We pray to be grateful
And give thanks for life

By Kaiyu Bayles

You go! 

Yes u got pain sista girl
Loosin your mama ain’t easy
Split up from your grandma well that’s real hard too!
What happens when your not safe changes everything about you
Sayin goodbye to old friends and babies too
But plenty of people before you made it through

Your allowed to cry, it’s been tough
On your own u need more than luck
Take that pain sis its yours,and love it
Yeas you could have been this and that
But you can’t take that back
Look after yourself – relax

No fears with the tears
Let them flow
Choking n smoking
Feeling yourself grow
It’s ok Sis – let it go

Look back on pain and happiness
Live in the moment
Create that bliss
And remember without the blues
 you wouldn’t be you

By Kaiyu Bayles

WHY CANT I JUST B ME 

Why cant I just be Kaiyu
Why cant I just be me
All this stress n responsibility
I just wanna be free

Yaraka, Mara, Jyda, Kia, Binowee
They all me
Alison, Laina N Dee
Let me Be, You go, Be free

Granny here now, I’m feelin sad
Don’t know what’s goin on. N feelin bad
Everythings goin to be all right
Just one more night

By Kaiyu Bayles

Take A Moment

To think about the clothes you’re in
Are You Comfortable
To think about that house you call home
Is it really a Castle?
To think about the family you’re in
How happy is everyone and why?

Take a moment
Before you leave today
Think
What makes you happy?
And what does not
Because change
Starts with you…so
Take a moment

Greet the day
Just as our ancestors did
Speak words of kindness
To ourselves too
Heal your pain
Let yourself free
Eat the foods of the earth
Swim in her oceans and lakes
Say I love you at least once a day

Take a moment
Remember we are all great
Free yourself from the chains
How can you be?
If you’re not happy
Go back to being that free spirited child
We all deserve to be free
We can and will make it right… Just
Take moment

Love the skin your in
Discover your true talents
Practice Gratitude and fewer attitudes
Love Peace More and Hate War Less
Still having trouble? Well that’s cool too
When you c that child smiling
That’s what it’s all about
Yes there’s negativity all around
But change is a coming
But first we all have to

Take a moment
Own our pain, heal it
Breath, Lets not exist but live life
Hold on to your loved ones
Lead the way for all
Let love and positivity rule
Not politicians, jobs and school
Let’s recreate true happiness
For one and all
Take a moment
.. ..
More answers lay deep in our beautiful lands
Turn to our brothers and sisters who carry the true way forward
Harmony, balance and respect for great and small
Since the beginning
This can be ours now
Handed down through you and me

Take a moment
We will move forward soon
We have to dig deeper in time
Make those ancient laws yours and mine
Teach them to our children, communities and countries
Are we heading for destruction as 1 people?
Have the answers for a real proper society been left in time?

Take a moment
For the future of all
Maintain principals that stand tall

Take this moment right now

By Kaiyu Bayles

Reverse It

Reverse It… please,

wearing rags, clothes I mean,

happiness hardly seen,

Loosing sight of whats right, learnin nothing in schools,

Talking English, Living in houses and Jails, no good rules

Money supposed to be important, people always fight

Na Not me, I’m Indigenous to Thee

We belong to beauty possessed by you and me, but now we all crying

All together was Mother Earths creations, laying, walking and flying,

Words of wisdom, love in everyone, peace always a given

Free we was, off our home we were driven

I can feel the pain and the sorrow,

What will come tomorrow?

Whiteman, yellow man, black man need to make a stand….

Make their ways count, discover the lors we have for this land

Save us all….  No more Jails, Housing estates, highways, murders and rapes

No more Red tape…..  Reverse it Please!

We might all be free, not just the old aborigine

Kaiyu Moura

Let’s Indigenize it all ay?

My poems Freedom

Eyes open mind shut
Gonna start the day? Nuh
Mumma’s gone, granny two,
N the population, we 2.2
No more boomerang no more spear
We reachen for the powder, yarndi, n beer
The chains remain, see the pain
Hear the silence, no rain?
Pain and suffering day after day
Old n young searchin for a new way
Gotta organise, stick together and stay strong
No more these fullas, doin us all wrong
We know what ought to be done
Let’s lead the way and on the way we goinn have some 

Freedom was taken but we can get it back
Love that skin your in, the family your in we not slack
Freedom – we got the red yellow and black
Live life to the fullest, with the finest, never crack
Freedom- 4 one an alll – back on track
Good times and good friends
Together we can be, we gots to be
Like the wind, birds, ocean and sea
FREE

Indiginise your mind, hear the music
Free your body, move your feet
Dance with mother natures mystic beat
Speack your tongue,
live with love!
Listen to the echoes of the past
We gotta get freedom fast
Cancer, tumurs and heart disease
Animals disappearing and cutting our trees
Time to change the fight, no more struggle
Ask them fullas do the right
Not just by us, by their ole fullas,
They must!

Disabled by physicals, racism, hate or greed
Freedom’s what we all need

Empowered by the idea of freedom in every way for all – achieved through the concepts of indigenization.  Hit a nerve?  Let’s brainstorm
 
By Kaiyu Bayles

My poems Wheres the tribe?

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
My bodies giving in, tell me their alive.
How many are crying? Tired of trying?
Forgotten people, forgotten time? Not in my mind.

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
I got to get there, drive, swim or fly.
Ther’ll be no more ear ache, from no-good words
And no eating this food, feeling worse afterwards.

Where is my people? Where is my tribe?
Got you in my heart and freedom’s in our path.
Connecting back up with one another
The animals, our ways and the land, our mother.

Here is my people. Here is my tribe.
Human being roaming free, the ole spirit inside of me.
Ready? Our season is near. Just like our wildflower
With the might and strength of our creator,
We shall bloom a new era.
Breathe…Be at Ease…Believe…

By Kaiyu Bayles

My lyrics, i need a bit of help with getting the message out.

Deep B.L.A.C.K Songlist

Is It Always Going To Feel This Way?

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

This our Island home
Free n easy we roam.
Disrupted 100,000 years of peace
For convicts and their police.
You’ve no jurisdiction,
With a history like science fiction.
Cause we have listened, we have learned, 
We have laughed, cried and yearned…
So this Westminster system with no jurisdiction
Is about to be overturned.

Confusioned, disillusion,  
where’s the rebelution?
Keep a check on how we feel,
Are we all keeping real?
Keep checkin our relation
Cause from nation to nation
We are all racin to nowhere land and
We need to understand…

Because, it’s not meant to be like this
Bein helpless
Not meant to feel like this
Clenchin our fists. 
Kneeling and praying each day,
Is it always going to feel this way?

(Language)

GOORI’S!!!!!!!!!!
Rise up, Rise up, Rise up.
Sovereign people still today
For a new day, for our old ways.
Time to thrive,  we have survived.
Even modern day genocide.
Colonisation, segregation, assimilation and  now reconciliation…
Got all our ears achin!
So let’s go walkabout n coorooboree now..
Dreamin’s alla time – anytime, 

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

 It’s not meant to be like this
Lacking a mothers kiss
Not meant to feel like this
Lil joyfulness
If we kneel n pray, for it to go away
 Is it always goin to feel this way?

This land where you stand needs man to understand
This is sacred land,
Everywhere you walk, sit or stand,
Our people been there.
Home 2 da rainbow serpent and red sand
Law, histories, song and dance.
It’s coming back from the surface
To put an end to this circus.
We know a better way
From living in a better day.
Now Sssshhh, while we watch our children play.
There ain’t no mystery
We governed, we tilled and documented history.
In 2011 you can’t get away with Invasion
Put an end to this illegal occupation, of a nation, 
Stop rations, listen,  be patient.
Kicking off the heads of our next generation,
Now still victims of corporate rascists.
We the key ingredient!
All this talk, anybody meanin it?
Experience and understanding is seldom 
Yet knowledge plus consequences, equals, wisdom.
Don’t it?

Not meant to be like this,
Life is politics
Not meant to feel like this
Bunch of lunatics at it,
If we try a different way
Is it always goin to feel this way?

(Language)

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

No, No, No,
It’s not to be this way
Our spirit still strong today
It’s not meant to feel this way
Sing, dance, shout now n play
The ole way back for a new day.

Together: Dedicated to our great, great, great, great, greats,
we shall b free In our home country.
To all our childrens, childrens, childrens, children,
Keep on smiling and thrivin on your Aboriginal Island.

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!
(language) 

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

The Block Rocks

Holden Street’s where my family began,
Nan hiding under the bed 
From the devil man.
Mum fought her way through,
No one had it easy I knew.
Cards was the go, though
But no takin things slow. though
The Railway view, The Clifton, The Empress.
Koori’s here dress to impress.
We got style,
Leave Paris in Denial.
And our love is strong
Kisses and cuddles are long.
Don’t mess around 
Or the block will come down
Around
You!

(Language)

Chorus:
The Block rox!
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Don’t mess it up!

From Newcastle, Mooli, n Cowra
To Walgett, Moori n Cumra!
We’ll be gatherin till eternity
And now it’s up to you and me!
To give the men a hand
Help with em a plan
Culture centre & Sports centre, we a solid community.
Let’s get  it together true Redfern unity
All the block babies, warriors, soldiers,
Everyone knows now cause we told em.
Hold up ya hands if ya care!
N Scream I’m there
(I’m there)
I Care
(I care)
If that qualified as a petition
The world would listen.

Since the beginning of their visiting
We been holdin em out – resisting.
Pamulway, Tedbury,
They showed the way!
Uncle Doug, Uncle Ken n Uncle Max,
They knew not to be too relaxed.
Like the Redfern All Blacks
Keep the ball in motion,
Just like a rolling ocean.
Truth is always the potion,
Let’s move this notion.

The Block Rox!

(language)

Chorus:
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!

Forget the Harbour Bridge, Centre Point, The Rocks,
Bondi & Darling Harbour  – the Block Rox!
What a sad day
That one in Botany Bay.
So called brutes and Terranulias.
You fulla’s shamed your king and yourselves,
Changing paradise into a colony.
Forgetting along the way, humanities.
But now we strong and each one of us is free.
Hardened by misery.
Cause today the top dogs 
Still bring in the top rocks.
But No matter what 
The Block will always Rock!
Yes its the black heart,
Redfern was the very start,
Of many things, great.
A late congrats to all who’d congregate,
for our communities, our race.
FACTSIA, Activists, 
With all the mad tactics
Medical centre and childcare.
Still on the Block we always share.
For the work you do, 
We all thank you
Uncle Shane, Aunty Ali n all the mob that rallies 
Together for Redfern, it’s your turn 
to sing:

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

Chorus: 
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!

To the whole Redfern family,
U a big part of me.
Specially those we’ve lost.
And we’ll never loose the block!
No sellin off
To no yupee lot
I oppose any notion 
That goes against the grain of the people n the emotion.
I hope this message travels across the land,
All hear it, Koori woman and man.
The blocks still under threat,
They tryin to knock it down n attack it with bricks and cement.
Is any body available – (to comment?)
Whose liable,
When the grandchildren come to gather
And there’s not even a shadow.
To remind them of the times,
All the years, all the people gone by?
All the years Redfern shines,
Always so fresh in my heart and mind.
I’m one to put a stop to, well start…
We can’t be sold out by no retard.
No disrespect.
No harm meant.
Be accountable,
Don’t let it fall!
I can’t it’s where I learnt to crawl!
N people there changed my nappy…
The block is where we’re all happy!

Cause 

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

(language)

Chorus: 
We been here too long,
We too strong!
Your plans are no good 
Wantin the block to look good.
No rain’s goin to come,
Once development’s began.
Mix it up, fix it up,
Please don’t mess it up!
You only got one shot.

The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!
The Block Rox!

Breathe

Chorus: 
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

Language (fast dance beat)

Cause they don’t know how they feel,
Let’s keep these dictators reel.
We been driven from our lands.
Are we controlled by the man?
All is as it’s meant to be.  They say.
And we can’t fix a world that’s not broken 
But so many words go unspoken.
So man’s direction has to be criticised
For disillusioned plans to civilise.
We the most documented race,
But nobody really knows,
Even though on 
All of our faces it shows.  

Chorus: 
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

But people care, there to lend a helping hand.
Is it enough though?
Life is tough you know?
Open your eyes; wanna scream?
Everything is as it’s meant to be.
Everything’s just as it’s meant to be?
Would I change a thing?
This damn democracy is crazy!
No, don’t, stop that, you can’t,
Even babies aren’t free.
These puppeteers of false mastery
Better off stickin to customary law…real mastery.

Kaiyu: Gotta look after number one?
How do you tell that to a mum?
All those who’ve had enough, open your heart
Where do they start?
Hear their screams,( is ok?)
What bout they dreams
Can we walk away because we feel this way…?
When lil help never went astray.

People care and someone’s always there.
The greatest of us, grew up tough,
Overcoming feelings of giving up.
So don’t scream, just breathe.
In n Out    In n Out  (background fast beat – In out, In out at same time).

C’mon people share and care to understand, first…
Kaiyu: Breath in and out.

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release.
All is as it’s meant to be.

Patty: Does the world get colder as we get older?
Can’t get sick, need an ear or a shoulder?
The unity is missin
From our communities.
To raise our children proper,
Let’s set up camp wherever.

People do care – there to lend a hand
Listen carefully – to the land
Open our eyes – we all got to realise…
People care – even wen the problem ain’t theirs.
Sing and dance now.

Close your eyes.
Close your mind.
Because everything, 
everything is as it’s meant to be.

Together, lets send love to all suffering and for freedom,
For the war torn and oppressed,
The hungry n homeless.

Together: Do we care? Care to really understand,
How we really feel?
How we really live?
Might make us wanna scream, but…
Take it slowly and… breathe.
Care to share n be there,
For the ones you love,
Before we give up.
Dare to dream,
Quieten our minds and breathe.

And join together,
One mob forever.
Bring our best selves
Aim for the top shelves.
And start to care
Or it could be the end of man, damn.
In the meantime, just breathe….

In n out (In out, In out).
In n out (In out, In out).

Language (fast dance beat)

Chorus:
Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be

Sometimes
When I rise up
Open my eyes up 
Wanna scream 
Wanna scram
Get the hell out here
But all is as it’s meant to be
Release, release, Oh release me.
All is as it’s meant to be.
Just Breathe In N Out 
(Breath in out, in out).

  
 
Sunshine In A Concrete Haze

Lil Kaiyu down Waterloo,
Down the PCYC you can find me, 
The factory, Laundromat,
The fern or market.
Not quiet what life was meant to be,
Shops n a lane – not reel free.
We were happy
Eatin fruit from a tree,
Drinkin water from a whole in the conrete.
Little women,
Meetin up – goin swimmen, 
Down the PA,
Go home n u have to stay.
No idea what was round the corner,
Sis, wished I could’ev warned ya.
Cuase it felt too good
In our lil neighbourhood
Across from the Rabbits
N all the bad habbits
So much goin down in our home town 
We were too busy bein little clowns

Chorus:
You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Your bodies tired and mind’s even worse,
You’ve seen it all 
N aint nothing to live for.
But this is your land!
Bloods on white hands!
You and me,
We free.
Send all the majik U can find,
Heal that pain and see us shine.
Our grannies were taken,
Our children forsaken.
And trying to awaken
From this nightmare called life,
Trouble, strife.
Old n new trauma is too much pain
For one too maintain.
It’s not all in vein,
Cause we can all remain
Part of that long, long chain.

(language)

Chorus:
You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

We free to enjoy each other n loving this experience,
Make time to cry n still marvel at our brilliance.
We can learn to live, love n laugh,
Even if making the most of this day is hard.
Learn just 1 word, listen n smile,
Play with children, run a mile.
Our mind needs exercise.
Soon we’ll all realise,
With these strong blood lines,
It’s still our time.
Swim in our waters, eat our food,
Rid all problems with mood.
And with all this began,
Wat will invasion really have done.
Aborigine – part o’ u’s in part of me.
Me n you, you n you, we gotta become we.
We all branches off the one tree.
That’s how we put an end to world hostility.

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!
Chorus:

You see we love Redfern n Waterloo too!
Even far away it’s still in you.
But take us home 
Where our spirits free to roam.
Our ole ways 
Like cleaning rays
Too much sorry time
In all our lives…
Brothers n sisters we free – You n Me!

(language)

This song is dedicated to the sufferers of invasions. There experiences are a direct result of systems gone wrong from the beginning.  Who feels it the most? The disadvantaged. Even though they do not engage in it in any way they experience the brink of the rapes, the violence, the murders, drugs, degradation and overall disregard of one of the greatest treasures of all time. Human Kind.

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

Cause we the deadliest,
The strugglers!
They goin bleed us,
We goin Lead us!

 
 
Is It Always Goin 2 Feel This Way?

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

This our Island home
Free n easy we roam.
Disrupted 100,000 years of peace
For convicts and their police.
You’ve no jurisdiction,
With a history like science fiction.
Cause we have listened, we have learned, 
We have laughed, cried and yearned…
So this Westminster system with no jurisdiction
Is about to be overturned.

Confusioned, disillusion,  
where’s the revolution?
Keep a check on how we feel,
Are we all keeping real?
Keep checkin our relation
Cause from nation to nation
We are all racin to nowhere land and
We need to understand…

Because it’s not meant to be like this
Bein helpless
Not meant to feel like this
Clenchin our fists. 
Kneeling and praying each day,
Is it always going to feel this way?

(Language)

GOORI’S!!!!!!!!!!
Rise up, Rise up, Rise up.
Sovereign people still today
For a new day, for our old ways.
Time to thrive,  we have survived.
Even modern day genocide.
Colonisation, segregation, assimilation and  now reconciliation
Got all our ears achin!
So let’s go walkabout n coorooboree now..
Dreamin’s alla time – anytime, 

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

Patty: It’s not meant to be like this
Lacking a mothers kiss
Not meant to feel like this
Lil joyfulness
If we kneel n pray, for it to go away
Kaiyu: Is it always goin to feel this way?

Patty: This land where you stand needs man to understand
This is sacred land,
Everywhere you walk, sit or stand,
Our people been there.
Our rainbow serpent and red sand
Law, histories, song and dance.
It’s coming back from the surface
To put an end to this circus.
We know a better way
From living in a better day.
Now Sssshhh, while we watch our children play.
There ain’t no mystery
We governed, we tilled and documented history.
In 2008 you can’t get away with Invasion
Put an end to this illegal occupation, of a nation, 
Stop rations, listen,  be patient.
Kicking off the heads of our next generation,
Now victims of corporate rascists.
We the key ingredient!
All this talk anybody meanin it?
Experience and understanding is seldom 
Yet knowledge plus consequences, equals wisdom.
Don’t it?

Not meant to be like this,
Life is politics
Not meant to feel like this
Bunch of lunatics at it,
If we try a different way
Is it always goin to feel this way?

(Language)

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

No, No, No,
It’s not to be this way
Our spirit still strong today
It’s not meant to feel this way
Sing, dance, shout now n play
The ole way back for a new day.

Together: Dedicated to our great, great, great, great, greats,
we shall overcome In our home country.
To all our childrens, childrens, childrens, children,
Keep on smiling and thrivin on your Aboriginal Island.

Chorus: 
We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!
(language) 

We were here you know?
Long, long, long, long time ago.
In this bright green country
For us to all roam freely
Why would you change It?
I have to  ask this nation.
Got to realise it.
Then Indigenize It!

  
 Anything Is Possible

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Your beautiful, spiritual n sensual,
So young, yet so sensible.
You make me shine
N smile all the time.
I never knew I was so strong,
I hadn’t been happy for so long.
This love is amazing,
It drives me crazy.
And when I look at you,
That light is shinning thru.
Enjoyin the kids and life,
I’d gladly be your wife.
Because with you, anything is possible,
Everything is real.

(Language)

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Oh n how u love me,
You believe in me,
Your overwhelmin me,
By helping me get to my feet.
With you I feel complete.
I hold your hand, 
Proud to call you my man.
We can do anything,
Together just being.
We’re so happy.
All the time.
N it’s our time to shine.

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Yes let’s fish n swim,
The way u treat u’r woman.
U know how to have fun,
Lift my head when its hung.
Talk, play the PSP
Books, n movies,
We even paint beautifully,
Create a life mural.
I promise we’ll do well.
I’m here for you,
Right next to you.
All the way,
What he say.
N for me you do the same.
You’re a father, a hunter.
N ooohhh I  just luv ya
With you anything is possible
Everything is real.

(Language)

Chorus:
It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
Squeezin forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
We belong forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

It was spiritual majik 
All round me.
I thought that Island home had trapped me.
I’m alive, ready to thrive.
With you I wanna dance it through.
Dreamin together, 
We belong forever.
I love U! I Love U! 
True I do!
N Only You. 

Herstory

Matriarch, sacred feminine,
The sun moon balance.
Divinity decided by vanity.
And so becomes history.
Your hollyness was a man
His other half – you guessed it, a woman.
Standing strong
Ready to carry the messages on.
I’m a disciple of the old way,
Again and again you’ll hear me say,
Herstory is here to stay!

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

Free thinker have learned
Back then we’d a be burned.
Like the first testament
N the scriptures
That might contain some truth.
Who they tryin to fool,
Telling us all to believe
This father of Jesus,
Made us?
Our mothers created us.
Believe in ourselves.
G.O.D
Is the Great Out Doors.
So pay attention to the seasons,
And look at all the reasons, 
We ended up here.
We’re in drivers seat – steer.
Look after the sisters
Nurture her.
Or stay clear n live in harmony with mother nature
She’ll save ya.
There’s a female half to all things,
Can’t u c it’s missing?
We are out of balance and out of wack,
Herstories got to come back.

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

Dubai, Jundal, Kudgerie!
Woman Magic!

Why do you mock our business?
Ladies night at clubs,
Distasteful pubs.
Cause women are the champions of all time.
Standing behind,
At the brink of crime.
So with this rhyme
I hope to remind you all
We there to pick u up fall after fall.
Nurture you more and more.
Heal your pain,
Stop the world from goin insane.
So let’s go back, back in time.
To a way even I’d be happy to live by.
And instead of worshippin myths and legends,
Kings and Queens- 
There is no other,
Like a mother.
Yes it’s pagan
Like Yagan.
Where we began.
Fire, water, sun and moon,
When it’s full notice, that change in you?
And harvest times were Christmas 
Before Christians.
But we still half thinkers, missin…
What is it? The feminine.
So let’s get in touch with it,
We all need mothering.

Chorus:
Women’s business,
It’s serious.
It’s not gone, why dismiss it?
Live with it, 
Start sharin it.
Cause we had it tight, right, right, right, back.
And on a feminist track 
We had a lot to do with that!

You gotta know it –
To be a warrior
You gotta show it – 
To be a soldier
You gotta luv it – 
Let her rock ya, world!
In the Moonlight,
Watch us shine bright.
To drum beats,
We movin right.
Loving all of it, 
Lookin sweet!
Needin leeders,
We need her.
Believe that
No matter what!
You know where we came from now let’s
Live a life that’s wholesome.

Dubai, Jundal, Kudgerie!
Woman Magic!
Chorus x 2

 
 
Look Out…

(warning: contains issues dealing with sexual violence)

We feel like scrubbing hard,
Runnin a yard,
Punch and scream real loud.
And you, your runnin you coward,
Leavin me forever in half,
In your path.
Hope you soon land in hell. 
What just happened – who to tell?
Where’s my safe place?
Keep my mind at a safe pace.
Dr’s, lawyers, police, family n Psychology,
How’s anyone gonna help me?
Grown men to lil girls, 
Upside down goes their worlds.

I’m goin to see you one day,
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help.
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to repair what’s no longer there.

Where, how do people loose control,
And take like a car needs petrol.
I hope you get help soon,
Before a new victims doom.
But where do we start,
Being worlds apart?
I feel sick, I’m scared,
You, you better be scarred.
Love n kindness not
Anger n violence.

I’m goin to see you one day.
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to face your disgrace.

Care to loosen
This noose I’m wearin?
Ever thought about it
All the pain created?
That you initiated,
Debilitating.
Worth the lives taken?
One day soon I’l be free
From the misery you put on me.
My body’s my shrine
And more importantly it’s mine.
If I forgave you 
What would that do?
Really, how much good is still in you?
Plus.. the pain you cause,
You could never undo.

I’m goin to see you one day,
Why’d you do that I’m a say?
Somebody hurt you that bad,
You go make hundreds sad?
Go on tell me your problems – if that’ el help.
I’l do anything to end this living hell.
But it’s time for you to prepare.

Years of living lost,
You cant imagine the loss.
Is this any skin of your nose?
I really gotta know.
I am going to see you and I’l have all day.
I want to hear what you have to say.
I will walk away, start again.
For you – I’ll just say
Poor thing!

Kids Weekend

No tears, no fears, you got t be strong
Got to find a place where you belong.
Just shying away
Where faith dances straight.
Take time out, dig deep, deep down.
Keep your head up high, u’r feet on the ground.
We decide how we’ll feel.
We decide how we heal.
Fillin our day with laughter and play, (please)
Look after each other and send love each day.
Seek n u shall find
What treasures I hide in my mind.

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

Wanna start out happy
All the family
Kids clean behind us 
For there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I’m me – who I’m meant to be
I’m a kid, I’m a kid!
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid.

I think I’ll fly a plane
N hope it don’t rain.
Then play shops
And buy the lot.
We’ll pretend to go to work
N that someone gets hurt.
We can be ten foot tall
Without a problem at all
But when I’m feelin down,
Please don’t turn around.
Cause one day soon
(I promise) I’ll be big like you.
But it don’t look real fun 
so let’s walk, not run.
And let’s get the party 
Begun.

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

I Wanna start out happy
All the family 
Kids clean behind us 
For there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I’d rather you be you – n I be me.
Cause I’m a kid, I’m a kid!
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid.
So you be you n I be me.

I can imagine being called your honour
Or being the prime minister.
If it were up to me maybe the world wouldn’t be so messed up.
I can play basketball,
Even pretend to start a war.
But I’d rather be peaceful,
Or even sing soulful.
Go home to get a quick bite,
This time I might take the bike
Or the skates or scooter.
I really love things with a loud hooter.
I’ll make some cool music
And pretend to go loopy.
Or be an adult
That would be yuck!

Chorus:
Listen please, listen to me.
As I sing, this song to u.
Hear my message coming through
Do we wanna be happy?
Do we wanna be free?
Boom shuck-a-lucka!
Twiddley diddley diddley dum
Twiddley diddley diddley dee

I Wanna start out happy
All the family
Kids clean behind us 
or there’s fun to be had
Have some fruit
Put on the boot
Love you all – I’m off
Cause I’m a kid 
– n I’m free
I like being me, can’t u see?
Cause I’m a kid, cause I’m a kid
A brainy, brainy, brainy, brainy kid!
I Love being me – can’t you see.
      I’m Free!
So listen please, listen to me.
N you and I will be complete!

 Written with Jamie Morgan

 
Mum’s The Word

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Irunjel: My mum’s always there 
Tries to help me understand.
N grows me up to be man.
Everyday should be mother’s day, her day, your day.
Put your feet up,
Have a massage.
I know for you it’s hard,
Kid’s, the job, house n lil rewards.
But, I’m gonna make you proud
Stand out in the crowd.
You’ve given me all I need,
So don’t worry now, please.
I chose the right one.
I got the very best mum.

(language)

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Tiga: Mother nature, creator.
They made us
And everything we see, 
Its all majk mother’s weave.
Protecting us,
Connecting us.
I need them kisses, how u hold me tight
N tell me I ‘m doing alright.
You listen n you feel my pain.
Mum, without you life ain’t the same.
But while we here together now,
For the finest job, please take a bow.

Cause the star to the show is……….

Mum!

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

(language)

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Irunjel:
Everyday your there
Every piece of you is shared.
What about you though
Where you wanna go?
Let’s spend some time,
I wanna see you really smile.
Taught me everything I know
How to wind down and take it slow,
Have fun, be playful while getting on with the show.

Tiga:
You only get one life
Live it wisely.
Treat people kind, you taught me.
Hold your head up high,
Always try hard,
Aim for the moon, at least you’ll land in the stars.
Be strong and loving.
Look after the land, family, 
culture and let that spirit dance.
Most importantly you taught me to take a stance.

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

(language)

Together: We look like our mum
Sound like our mum
We love you mum
The way you love us
The way your bringing us up
You’ve taken me everywhere 
I  even love fighting, 
the beach even shopping with you.
You’re the number girl in the world,
We’re the luckiest of all.
Put u # 1, whenever
Cause mum… you matter.

We walk together, read together, Talk together, swim together,
Ride together, drive together
I love our time together. 

Chorus:
Mum’s the word
That’s what you heard
My best friend, my teacher
Thanks to you I’m hear
My mother’s the bomb
Number 1! (scratched)
I love you mum,
Thanks for all that you’ve done.

Mum’s the word, (scratched)
That’s what I learned.
Where would I be, 
Without thee
Best mother.
Oh respect her, hear her, honour her, feel her.
 
Written with Tiga & Irunjel

How Insane (that Gin Lane)

Alcohol bans, treaten us like children
Over this alien substance,
An introduced nuisance.
Governments might as well be an endorsee,
It’s legal cause of the money in it.
Rum Corps, bribes and slavery.
Here, that’s how it come to be.
But in London
For the peasants
Came an affordable drink,
Makin life for the poor gut renchin.
A lane for drunks and gins.
We got called the very same thing.
Babies hangin by there feet,
Mothers without teeth.
It’s a little different,
Just convenient
To label
The rebel.
All who drink 2 much turn to mongrel,
It’s not our way,
Drink it you say.
Make your pain go away.
But like the girls in gin lane,
Go insane.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

Ruining ourselves,
Fillin jail cells.
N wakin listenin to whats been done.
None of it fun.
It was me though
I don’t remember but I know.
Bit humiliating,
The self blaming.
Born on the hottest coals,
Just need a lil calm n self control.
We loose another day, week, year,
We’ll get sober.
Fixing livers
Start really livin.
But what else is there to choose
I mean instead of drinkin booze?
There ain’t many options,
I can only think of one.
To get back to our roots
All of our truths.
Find ourselves.
Lost is easier to control
But come on -not our, parkies, goomies or drones.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

We cant be lifer’s
Good liver – Good livin
Cant imprison ourselves
Lets fix the liver cells 
Feel alive
Thrive!

We cant be lifer’s
Good liver – Good livin
Cant imprison ourselves
Lets fix the liver cells 
Feel alive
Thrive!

Giving up can be empowering,
But goin need supporting.
Our old ways are here you know
From long time ago.
To stand up strong, in this land
Where we belong.
Reclaim our bodies,
Yeah be a little sorry
But it’s amazing
This thing covered in skin.
It can heal with love and kindness, like all of us, with niceness.
It’s the only solution –
Steps towards a health revolution.
Something different? Something new?
Or recycle the idea of goin back
On an original Aboriginal track?
With alcohol out of the equation
Lets go about undoing the effects – decolonisation.

Chorus:
Cause we had no such thing as an alcoholic
Or gin and tonic.
Yeah people got high from time to time,
Medicine, help to relax the mind.
Today though we choose dope or hope
To cut the chains, the shackles, the ropes.
Cause we beautiful and culture colourful,
We true!

C That Star!

Dedicated to Yarraka Bayles on your 27th birthday.

Yarraka u’r a beaming star

You da mumma Luck, 
The aunty Yak.
With an unbelievable power,
For the family, like a tower, yet a flower.
My sister,
All that time together, 
Is what I really miss, 
It’s me n u sis.
Never alone now,
You keep me goin and glowin.
I never did enough,
When you were doin it tough,
Down on your luck.
Stupid, I was stuck!
As the years go by you know,
I’m letting go, 
Lettin my love show,
Mo n mo .
So let’s do this sis.
Let’s start some shi……

Chorus:
You C that star – that’s my sistar
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer now,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

When we step up,
With sisters like us,
People know to make a fuss!
We real!
Showin all the deal.
With mum beside us,
We here to have fun.
N we’ll always be there,
Lookin out for each other,
I’m by your side now, forever.

Cause Yarraka – your the brightest star!

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

With personality galore,
Since u were small.
Impressin with your dressin,
You have your own fashion.
Always mellow n yellow
But still letting me know.
Teachin me a lot, and
Not even aware of it.
We have to take a fall
We’ll get the right call.
U got the right stuff to be directin us,
Beautiful n tuff!
And for being there from day 1,
Through my tough spot,
Yarraka, I can’t thank you enough.

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer now,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

You’ve waled alone
But not no mo,
Your love is gold and tight, I’ll hold it.
Together runnin, 
Since we had no pants on.
Growing up dancing
Laughin now at the romancing.
Tryin to move the tribe along,
We gotta thank mum n dad, we strong!
No where we belong and
Never forget where we came from!

Youthful
Artistic
Realistic
Romantic with
Attitude
Kaiyu loves u, (watch her she’s) 
Aware (n truthful)

Be there for her now
Cause Yarraka you’re the star!

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer you know,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

So pretty and golden n
Plenty a breath you’ve stolen.
Yes a heart breaker,
But straight up and never a fake faker.
So I’d like to see you keep up
With Lili, Lala and they’re mum.
Names to look out for,
Gonna hear roars for one day
For the girls with a majikal ways.
Yeah, you’ll feel em commin from miles
Feel they’re smiles see the styles,
Of strong black women in the 21 century,
Watch these ones as they show us how it’s meant to be.

Chorus:
Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer n Let go,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly.

Yeah C that star – She my sistar!
Small baby dark cloud
U keep standin proud
Cause 27 years now
It’s time to cheer n Let go,
Cause your one of a kind,
(Here comes) 2009 – 
Watch this sister fly!

Jay-Z & Beyonce Illuminate?

Hip hop/rap listeners have we been taken 4 fools or the ride of our lives?

Rumors have swirled for years that certain elite members of the black community are part of the secret order of Masons. The Masons are a secret society of brothers who recognize each other through a series of clandestine signals such as a special secret handshake and symbolism.

http://www.sandrarose.com/ has finally picked up on this.. That is what she had to say about it.

Now everyone knows that the Illuminate is a “super group” who is looking to stage by stage take over this world and make everyone else powerless. They are supposed to be Satanic and all those affiliated will give out subliminal messages of their links….. there are so many with Jay-Z/Kanye etc…even 2Pac complained at one point that he was being forced by the Illuminate to join…but he didnt want to…and shortly after speaking out he died. Check the video:

The question is: Why would Jay-Z. Beyonce, Kanye etc be affiliated by the Illuminate/Free Masons/New World Order. Why would they be interested in these young black people? Well the answer is simple… the best way to start mind control over the youth of today is through their most popular means. Music. Like it or not Beyonce and Jay-Z have been dominating the music scene for at least a decade if not longer.

New World Order Currency: The all-seeing-eye on the dollar bill. Below the illuminati pyramid/eye symbol are the words: “Novus Ordo Seclorum,” which can be translated as: “A new order of the ages”. Notice anything similar?

Now I am a Obama supporter as I previously stated but what if all this Black President ish is just a way of distracting us from what is really going on. Obama might not even realise it himself….look at how Beyonce & Jay-Z literally ran the presidential campaign and performed relentlessly to get the Youth vote and the Ethnic minority vote.
Here is what the rapper Prodigy had to say about Jay-Z and his association:
“J.Z. knows the truth, but he chose sides with evil in order to be accepted in the corporate world. J.Z. conceals the truth from the black community and the world, and promotes the lifestyle of the beast instead. J.Z is a God damn lie. I have so much fire in my heart that I will relentlessly attack J.Z, Illuminati, and any-every other evil that exists until my lights are put out. This negativity I speak of is an actual living entity that uses us as food. We must sever ties with it in order to see things for what they really are. This negative energy is created and harnessed by the Illuminati secret government and they will make you spread this energy without you even knowing it. But people like J.Z. are very well aware. He was schooled by Dr. York”

Tidbits: Jay-Z calls himself Hova which is short for JeHova (JayHova) meaning the God or Saviour. Rocafella is also an interesting name… one of the main Illuminati leaders is called Rockafella.

When a friend alerted me to the suspicious hand signals exhibited by rappers Jay Z, Sean Combs and NBA star Ron Artest in the above pics, the first thing I thought was that the handshakes looked like some ol’ regular hood greetings to me. But of course I was wrong, as the friend pointed out.

He told me he was positive the greetings held some special significance because he had heard that Sean, Jigga and Ron were secret members of the Masons. Well, if these Masonic handshakes are supposed to be so secret then how is it that non-members know what they look like?

Then I thought well, maybe the Masons is an exclusive down low club. It would not be far outside of the realm of possibility considering that we are talking about Diddy and Jay Z.

But it turns out the Masons are not a secret society of well-to-do homos at all. It’s a brotherhood of powerful men, sort of like a fraternity, who keep the power and the money within the society.

Members of the Masons are alleged to be such powerful public figures as Barack Obama, Jay Z, Sean Combs, Russell Simmons, Kobe Bryant, Michael Jackson, Ron Artest, Jamie Foxx, etc. In other words, black men with money and influence.

I Googled Masonic handshakes to see if there was anything to all of this, and what I found were examples of greetings that were difficult to distinguish from the normal handshakes, fist bumps and daps that you see brothers (and the Obamas) exchange every day. But who am I to question? I’m just repeating what I was told by the friend who has studied Masonic handshakes exhaustively.

I will do some more research on this subject and get back to you. And then again, I might not…

Information on the Web:

http://www.masonicsecrets.org/masonic-secrets.html

POSTED BY SOULGIRLY AT 10:34

Source: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_lXfgFaXeKkg/SgRGHbbcBUI/AAAAAAAACpo/XFZ_SSlT2sg/s1600-h/sean-jigga-masonic.jpg

Check out the video’s on this Destiny’s Child Rumour Page, scarey!!!

Key statistical information Australia

Contents >> Executive Summary

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
These key findings are from articles released as the comprehensive series The Health and Welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (Updated 14/04/2011)
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population comprises around 2.5% of the Australian population and is relatively young.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have lower life expectancy than non-Indigenous Australians.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language and culture is being maintained.
Socioeconomic outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians continue to improve, but remain below those for non-Indigenous Australians.

Torres Strait Islander people (Updated 17/02/2011)
Torres Strait Islander people comprise 0.3% of the total Australian population and 10% of the total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.
Many health and welfare outcomes for Torres Strait Islander people were similar to those for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Education (Updated 14/04/2011)
Educational attainment among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians continues to improve.
Higher levels of educational attainment are associated with better health outcomes.

Social and Emotional Wellbeing (Updated 29/10/2010)
Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults reported being happy.
Around one third of adults reported high/very high levels of psychological distress.
Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experienced discrimination.
Around one in twelve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults have personally experienced removal from their natural family.

Adult health (Updated 28/05/2010)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have poorer self-assessed health and were more likely to report higher levels of psychological distress than non-Indigenous Australians.
Latest results show a decline in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smoking rates, while alcohol consumption remains steady.

Mothers’ and children’s health (Updated 28/05/2010)
There are a number of positive findings in relation to maternal health and factors affecting childhood development, including high rates of breastfeeding and physical activity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Disability (Updated 17/02/2011)
Half of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had a disability or long-term health condition.
Disability was associated with poorer health and welfare outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Housing circumstances (Updated 29/10/2010)
Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults lived in rented housing, however, the proportion living in homes being purchased has increased.
Fewer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people lived in housing with major structural problems, but overcrowding rates remain similar.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults living in housing with structural problems were more likely to report high/very high levels of psychological distress.
Access to health and community services (Updated 29/10/2010)
The majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households could locally access a range of medical and hospital services when needed.
Nationally, just over one-quarter of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults reported problems accessing one or more health services.
Community services and facilities that were less likely to be locally available when needed included emergency services, police stations and school bus services.
Parents/carers of around one in seven Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children needed (more) formal child care.

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES — DEMOGRAPHIC, SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population comprises around 2.5% of the Australian population and is relatively young:
At June 30 2006, the estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 517,000 people, or 2.5% of the total Australian population.
In 2006, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population had a median age of 21.0 years compared with 37.0 years for the non-Indigenous population.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females have higher fertility, with an estimated total fertility rate of 2.57 babies per woman, compared with 1.90 babies per woman for all Australian females.
At June 2006, most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people lived in non-remote areas with an estimated 32% of people living in major cities, 43% in regional areas, and 25% in remote areas.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have lower life expectancy than non-Indigenous Australians:
At the national level for 2005–2007, the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous life expectancy was 11.5 years for males and 9.7 years for females.
Life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males is estimated to be 67.2 years, compared with 78.7 years for non-Indigenous males.
Life expectancy at birth for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females is estimated to be 72.9 years, compared with 82.6 years for non-Indigenous females.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language and culture is being maintained:
In 2008, 19% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over (adults) and 13% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (aged 3–14 years) spoke an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are identifying with a clan, tribal or language group, 62% in 2008 up from 54% in 2002.
70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (aged 3–14 years) and 63% of adults (15 years or over) were involved in cultural events, ceremonies or organisations in 2008.

Socioeconomic outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians continue to improve, but remain below those for non-Indigenous Australians:
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people completed Year 12 — 22% of people aged 15 years and over in 2008, up from 18% in 2002.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people completed non-school qualifications — 40% of people aged 25–64 years in 2008, up from 32% in 2002.
The unemployment rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians fell from 23% in 2002 to 17% in 2008, but remained more than three times higher than the rate for non-Indigenous Australians (5% in 2008).

The Torres Strait Islander population comprises 0.3% of the total Australian population and 10% of the total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population:
At June 30 2006, the estimated resident Torres Strait Islander population was 53,300 people, or 0.3% of the total Australian population.
Torres Strait Islander people comprised 10% of the total Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population nationally, and 23% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland.
Nationally, more Torres Strait Islander adults spoke an Australian Indigenous language than all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (31% compared with 19%).
Torres Strait Islander people were more likely than all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be participating in the labour force (73% compared with 65%) and to be employed (64% compared with 54%) in 2008.
Many other health and welfare outcomes for Torres Strait Islander people were similar to those for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
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EDUCATION

Educational attainment among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians continues to improve:
Apparent school retention rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander full-time students from Year 7/8 to Year 12 increased from 36% in 2000 to 47% in 2010.
Nationally, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over completing Year 12 increased from 18% in 2002 to 22% in 2008. The rate of Year 12 completion has also improved in all states and territories.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are completing non-school qualifications, 40% of 25–64 year olds in 2008, up from 32% in 2002.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people were fully engaged in work and/or study in 2008. Just over half (54%) of young people aged 15–24 years were either working full-time, studying full-time, or both working and studying; up from 47% in 2002.

Higher levels of educational attainment are associated with better health outcomes:
In 2008, 59% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–34 years who had completed Year 12 reported excellent/very good self-assessed health compared with 49% of those who had left school early (Year 9 or below). For those aged 35 years and over, the rates were 43% and 25% respectively.
The likelihood of smoking also decreased with higher levels of schooling, 34% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–34 years who had completed Year 12 were current daily smokers compared with 68% of those who had left school early. For those aged 35 years and over, the rates were 36% and 48% respectively.
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SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELLBEING

Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults reported being happy:
In 2008, 72% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over (adults) reported being a happy person all or most of the time, with rates higher among adults living in remote areas (78%) than non-remote areas (71%).

Around one-third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults reported high/very high levels of psychological distress:
31% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported high/very high levels of psychological distress. Rates were particularly high among those with a disability or long-term health condition, those who had been victims of violence, or who had experienced discrimination.

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experienced discrimination:
More than one-quarter (27%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had experienced discrimination in the last 12 months.
One in ten (11%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 4–14 years reported being bullied at school because of their Indigenous origin.

Around one in twelve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults have personally experienced removal from their natural family:
In 2008, 8% (26,900 people) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had been personally removed from their natural family, consistent with the rate reported in 2002 (also 8%).
Of those who had experienced removal from their natural family, 35% assessed their health as fair or poor and 39% experienced high or very high levels of psychological distress, compared with 21% and 30% of those not removed.
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ADULT HEALTH

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have poorer self-assessed health and were more likely to report higher levels of psychological distress than non-Indigenous Australians:
In 2008, 44% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported excellent/very good health and 22% reported fair/poor health.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely as non-Indigenous people to report fair/poor health. This gap has remained unchanged since 2002.
While nearly one-third of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 years and over had experienced high/very high levels of psychological distress, this was more than twice the rate for non-Indigenous people.

Both tobacco smoking and excessive alcohol consumption are major health risk factors. Latest results show a decline in Indigenous smoking rates, while alcohol consumption remains steady:
Between 2002 and 2008, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander current daily smokers fell from 49% to 45%, representing the first significant decline in smoking rates since 1994. However, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people remained twice as likely as non-Indigenous people to be current daily smokers.
Around one in six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over (17%) drank alcohol at chronic risky/high risk levels, similar to the rate reported in 2002 (15%).
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MOTHERS’ AND CHILDREN’S HEALTH

There are a number of positive findings in relation to maternal health and factors affecting childhood development including high rates of breastfeeding and physical activity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children:
In 2008, the majority of birth-mothers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–3 years (87%) had regular check-ups while pregnant (at least one every two months).
According to the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, three-quarters (76%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–3 years had been breastfed.
74% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 4–14 years were physically active for at least 60 minutes everyday, though the proportion was higher for those who lived in remote areas (84%).
The proportion of children aged 0–14 years who lived in a household where members usually smoked inside the house decreased from 29% in 2004–05, to 21% in 2008.
Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–14 years brushed their teeth at least once a day (71%). However, 25% of children aged 10–14 years had a tooth or teeth filled because of dental decay and 20% of children aged 5–9 years had experienced dental decay.
Eye or sight problems and ear or hearing problems were experienced by 7% and 9% of children aged 0–14 years respectively in 2008.
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DISABILITY

Half of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had a disability or long-term health condition:
Nationally, 50% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had a disability or long-term health condition in 2008. Around one in twelve (8%) had a profound/severe core activity limitation.
In non-remote areas, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were one and a half times as likely as non-Indigenous adults to have a disability or long-term health condition, and more than twice as likely to have a profound/severe core activity limitation.

Disability was associated with poorer health and welfare outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a disability were more than four times as likely as those without a disability to rate their health as fair/poor.
Half (50%) of all people with a disability or long-term health condition were receiving a government pension or allowance as their principal source of income in 2008.
36% of people with a disability had problems accessing services, such as doctors, hospitals or employment services, compared with 24% of those without a disability.
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HOUSING CIRCUMSTANCES

Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 yearsand over (adults) lived in rented housing, however the proportion living in homes being purchased is increasing:
In 2008, the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults lived in housing that was rented (69%).
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were living in housing that was being purchased in 2008 (20%) than in 2002 (17%).

Fewer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people lived in housing with major structural problems, but overcrowding rates remain similar:
While 26% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households were living in dwellings with major structural problems in 2008, this has reduced significantly since 2002 (34%).
In remote areas, the rate declined from 50% to 34% (of households) between 2002 and 2008.
One-quarter (25%) of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults lived in overcrowded housing in 2008 — this has not changed since 2002.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults living in dwellings with major structural problems were more likely to report high or very high levels of psychological distress compared with those who did not (37% compared with 28%).

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ACCESS TO HEALTH AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

The majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households could locally access a range of medical and hospital services when needed:
62% of households could access Aboriginal health care services in 2008
74% of households could access hospitals (63% in remote areas)
82% of households could access health/medical clinics (69% in remote areas).

Nationally, just over one-quarter (26%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported problems accessing health services such as long waiting times and cost:
Dentists, doctors and hospitals were the health services where people were most likely to experience problems (by 20%, 10% and 7% of people respectively).

Beyond health services, there were similar levels of availability of community facilities and services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households nationally. Services and facilities that were less likely to be locally available when needed included:
emergency services — not available for 20% of households
police stations — not available for 17% of households
school bus service — not available for 17% of households nationally and 39% of households in remote areas.

Parents/carers of around one in seven (14%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 0–12 years needed (more) formal child care:
In remote areas, unavailability of child care was the most common reason for not using more formal care (40% of children needing more care). In non-remote areas, it was cost (31%).
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This page last updated 13 April 2011
Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/lookup/4704.0Chapter100Oct+2010

ARE YOUR CHILDREN AT RISK?

For most parents it is impossible to understand or decipher what the ingredients in some of chil-dren‘s products actually are:

Have you ever looked at the ingredients list on your baby care and children‘s products and wondered what they are?

Have you ever researched what the ingredients are and what their purpose is?

Do you believe the ingredients are safe for your kids?

Are you aware of the effects the combination of some these ingredients may have on your baby and children‘s health and wellbeing?

Do you believe that products advertised or labelled ‗natural‘ or ‗organic‘ are safe to use?
ARE YOUR CHILDREN AT RISK?
Raise Questions, Seek Answers
When you know the truth about the chemicals in your baby and children‟s products you may be shocked at what you find!

Because you make ALL the choices and decisions for your children from birth to their formative years, it is vitally important that you make wise and informed choices for them.
You will decide: What products they are exposed to What medications they will take What food they eat Where and how they will live
Are you aware of the toxins they may be exposed to from their baby products and in their every-day environment?
What is that you require to help you understand the impact of toxins on your child‘s health and wellbeing now and for the future?
What do you think they would ask you in the future about the choices you are making for them today?
If your child had a choice, what would they choose?

Copyright © 2009 Niche Finders. All rights reserved.
Healthy Living
PUT YOUR BABY IN HARMONY WITH NATURE
We have all lathered and pampered our kids with all sorts of potions, lotions and concoctions so they feel soft and smell good. Most people intrinsically believe that companies would not inten-tionally promote or sell products that would harm our babies or children.
Is this really true?

“Look deep into nature and then you will understand everything better”
Albert Einstein

Inner Alchemy
The alchemists of ancient times were aware that the human body works in harmony with mother nature. They used her secrets in a form of natural chemistry, free from synthetic chemicals using only ingredients derived from plants, minerals, flowers and nature.
This fact is what makes natural substances more powerful than any synthetic substance created by man. Most modern men and women have detached themselves from nature. We now live in a world where every aspect of our environment is saturated with synthetic chemicals. Sad but true…
We have been fooled for decades into thinking that ‗synthetics‘ are the way of the future and that they are safe and superior to nature. Given the massive increases in cancer and other im-mune related diseases since the beginning of the chemical revolution in the 1930‘s and the cur-rent global environmental issues of our planet, we can see that this may not be the truth.

Eleven Facts about NT Bilingual Schools

FACT 1: Bilingual schools teach English and an Australian Indigenous language
Literacy in the ‘mother-tongue’ is taught while a child is learning to hear and understand English. Over the 12 years of schooling about 70% of teaching will be in English.

FACT 2: A small percentage of Indigenous students attend bilingual school
16% of remote Indigenous students (7.8% of all students) attend nine bilingual schools. The remaining 84% of remote Indigenous students do not attend bilingual schools.

FACT 3: Bilingual schools out perform non-bilingual schools
Previous NT studies in the 1980s and 90s have shown that bilingual schools out perform non-bilingual schools in key English literacy and numeracy areas. See Fact 3.1 references on page 2.
Both national and international studies strongly indicate that teaching literacy in the mother tongue is the better way to support the development of English literacy. See Fact 3.2 references on page 2.

FACT 4: No evidence against bilingual schooling
There has never been a formal independent published report showing that bilingual programs have been anything but successful.

FACT 5: Bilingual program achievements were noted
The achievements of bilingual schooling were noted in the Department’s Indigenous Languages and Culture Report.
See Fact 5 reference on page 2.

FACT 6: Bilingual schools produce more Year 12 or NTCE graduates
Of the 31 Year 12 graduates in 2007, 70% came from bilingual schools. This means that a student is almost 9 times more likely to graduate from Year 12 if they come from a bilingual school. See: NTDET 2006 Poster: You Can Do It.

FACT 7: More teacher graduates from bilingual schools
There are more teacher graduates from bilingual schools than non bilingual schools. Up to 1998, 75% of all graduates (Ass Dip and Dip Teaching) from BIITE came from bilingual schools, or up to 1998 a graduate teacher was about 20 times more likely to come from a bilingual school. See comment on page 2.

FACT 8: Indigenous ESL students have double the student/teacher ratio as migrant ESL students. Migrant children from non-English speaking backgrounds attend intensive English classes with a teacher/student ratio of 1 to 10. Indigenous students with low or no English proficiency attend classes with a teacher/student ratio of 1 to 22.

FACT 9: Labour’s broken election promise on Universal Human Rights
Labour has forgotten its 2007 election promise to honour Australia’s commitments to the Universal Human Rights
Declaration, to which Australian became a signatory in 1948. See Fact 9 reference on page 2.

FACT 10: Labour’s broken promise to endorse the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights
Labour’s pre-election (2007) platform endorsing the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights Article 14 (below) has been
ignored. See Fact 10 reference on page 2.

Fact 11: Labour ignores Australia’s obligations under UN Convention of the Rights of Child 1989
Australia’s obligations under this convention talk about discrimination on the basis of language, ethnicity andidentity. See Fact 11 reference on page 2.
Page 2 15/12/2008 Email comments to: john.greatorex@cdu.edu.au
Eleven Facts about NT Bilingual Schools – References

FACT 3.1 references:
3.1.1 Devlin, B. (1995). The evaluation of bilingual programs in the Northern Territory, 1973–1993. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 113, 25-41.
3.1.2 Christie, M., Gale, K., McClay, D., and Harris, S., (1981) Academic achievement in the Milingimbi bilingual education program TESOL Quarterly, 297-314

FACT 3.2 references:
3.2.1 Greene, J. (1998). A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of bilingual education.[WWW document.] Retrieved
December 4, 2008 from http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/JWCRAWFORD/greene.htm
3.2.2 Meyer, M. & Fienberg, S. (Eds.) (1992). Case of bilingual education strategies. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
3.2.3 Ramirez, J.D. (1992). Executive summary of longitudinal study of structured English immersion strategy, early exit and late exit transitional bilingual education programs for language minority children. Bilingual
Research Journal, 16 (1&2), 1-61.
3.2.4 Willig, A. (1985). A meta-analysis of selected studies on the effectiveness of bilingual education. Review of Educational Research, 55, 269-317.

FACT 5 reference:
NT DEET (2005) The Indigenous languages and culture in NT schools report (2004- 2005). Pages 35-37, Retrieved
December 4, 2008 from:
http://www.det.nt.gov.au/education/indigenous_education/previous_publications/indigenous_languages_culture_rep
ort/

FACT 7 comment:
Up to 1998 there were more bilingual schools, but as 3 out of every 4 teacher graduates came from a small number of bilingual schools (which in 2008 represents 16% of Indigenous students), then calculations show that up to 1998, a graduate teacher was approximately 20 times more likely to come from a bilingual school.

FACT 9 reference:
Universal Human Rights Declaration:
Article 26.
(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

FACT 10 reference:
UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights
Article 14:
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providingeducation in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.
Article 15
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations which shall be appropriately reflected in education and public information.
2. States shall take effective measures, in consultation and cooperation with the indigenous peoples concerned, to combat prejudice and eliminate discrimination and to promote tolerance, understanding and good relations among indigenous peoples and all other segments of society.

Fact 11 reference:
Convention on the Rights of the Child
Article 29.1
“… education of the child shall be directed to (c) the development of respect for the child’s parents, his or her own cultural identity, language and values, for the national values of the country in which the child is living, the country from which he or she may originate and for civilizations different from his or her own …”

Childhood is Now

“Let us put our minds together and see whatkind of life we can make for our children.”- Chief Sitting Bull.
I often hear people say, “Kids today are different, I would never have behaved that way as a child.” Are kids today different or is it kids’ lives today that are different? In her book, The Continuum Concept, Jean Leidloff points out that, “Natural logic forbids belief in the evolution of a species with the characteristic of driving its parents to distraction by the millions.” As new parents we are all told, “Enjoy your children now while they are little.” Yet how much of the day do we spend enjoying our children? Many parents spend more of their day struggling with their children than enjoying them. How has this come to be? What is making parenting today more often a struggle than a joy?

Parenting never used to be, and was never meant to be, a one or two person job. Parents used to have a village, a tribe, or at least an extended family to help care for and spend time with their children. Few families today have the resource of a live-in grandparent, aunt, uncle or nanny. Even when there are two parents in the home at least one of them is gone much of the time. Whenever there is only one adult to care for children, for extended periods of time, there often isn’t the time, attention or energy to fully meet everyone’s needs. Whether a family consists of a single parent and one child; a mom, a dad and three children; two partners and two children or a blended family with multiple moms, dads and stepsiblings, most families need more adult resources.

My experience with children is that when their needs are met and nothing is hurting them, they are a joy to be with. I’ve learned that children do not always have the language to tell us what is hurting them or what they need so they communicate their needs through “needy” behavior. When children are not a joy to be with, their behavior is usually an expression of unmet need. Just as a baby’s cry is a communication designed to bother us and move us to action to meet the baby’s needs, the needy behaviors of children are designed to bother us and move us to action to meet the child’s needs.

Ironically, when children communicate their unmet needs through needy behavior, the action adults often take is to try to change the child’s behavior. As long as we keep trying to change the behavior instead of meeting the need, those needy behaviors persist. If we look at our own behavior when our children’s needy behavior is driving us crazy, we usually find we haven’t spent much time with them and we’ve been too busy and stressed to connect with them. If we look at our behavior when we are enjoying our children, we find that we are spending time with them and not rushing them from one place to another.

There are many reasons why children have unmet needs. Sometimes we can’t hear our children’s needs because our own needs are screaming so loudly. Sometimes we lack information about their needs. Sometimes we have so little trust in our own internal voice that we listen to advice that goes against meeting our children’s needs. Most often, however, the reason children aren’t getting what they need is that our lives are too busy and we don’t have enough time to be with them and enough time to just let them be. One of the reasons parents are too busy is that there is not enough adult resource to do all that needs to be done. The loss of the extended family has been devastating to parenting and to childhood.

Childhood today is very different than it has ever been. Parents are busier and children are expected to keep the same pace. There are so many more things to do and places to go. Children have to get to day care, preschool, school, games, lessons, and appointments. They often spend as much time (or more) in the car, getting to and from these activities, as they do at the activity. Children are frequently in transition from one place to another. Children need time with their parents and time for unstructured play, time to just be. Kids today don’t get much of that. Most children today spend less time in their home, with their family, than children ever have.
Most parents tell me that transition times are the times of greatest conflict with their children.

Getting out the door in the morning and bedtime are often a struggle. It seems the very thing we enjoy about children is also the very thing that drives us crazy about them. Children live in the now. Their attention is completely on what they need, feel or are doing right now. When we are rushing to “get out the door” or trying to get them to bed we are not in the now. We are usually thinking about where we are going and what we have to do next. When transition means children have to leave what they are happy doing to go and do something they may not even want to do, children naturally resist.

The only real conflict that exists between parents and children is conflict of needs. Getting out the door is our need. Getting the kids to bed is our need. When a child’s need to have time with us or time to just be is unmet they know that going out the door or going to bed means those needs won’t get met . When children express their unmet needs through their behavior and that behavior conflicts with parents’ needs the conflict of needs often turns into a power struggle.
This summer many parents told me how much they enjoyed their children when they were on vacation and/or when family or friends were visiting. When I asked why they enjoyed their children so much at those times the answer was always the same. “We had more time and there were more adults to do what needed to be done, so we all had more time for ourselves and more energy and attention for the children.” How can we have more of this for our family in everyday life?

We may have to begin to create more adult resource in small ways. Parents could ask family members and friends to spend more time with our family on a regular basis. We can invite other families to do things with our family and invite single friends to be part of our family. We create an “extended family of choice.” When there are more adults to meet the needs of children there is less conflict of needs and fewer power struggles. Even one hour a week of more adult resource would make a positive difference.

Creating more resource will mean having to ask for support. Most parents find it difficult to ask. We may feel like we are imposing or that we are supposed to be able to do it all alone. None of us can do it well, alone. Time has shown us that. We all have to work together to make it work for everyone. The children who depend on us now to get their needs met will one day be the adults we depend on to meet our needs. They will only be able to give what they have received.
We won’t get a second chance to “enjoy them while they are little.” Meeting the needs of children takes time, energy and human resource. If we don’t create the resource to give us the time and energy to meet children’s needs now when they are little, we will spend the time dealing with their unmet need behaviors when they are big. Childhood is now. The more resource we create, the more everyone’s needs will be met. The more everyone’s needs are met, the more we will all enjoy the children, when they are little AND when they are big.

About the Author…

Pam Leo is an independent scholar in human development, a parent educator, a certified childbirth educator, a doula, a parent, and a grandparent. She began studying child development, psychology, sociology, and anthropology after her first child was born in 1972. “I wanted to learn why we are each born as a tiny innocent being, and some of us grow up to be a Mahatma Gandhi while others become an Adolf Hitler. What determines the difference? I was determined to find out.” As a family child care provider for children ages two to ten, Pam clocked up 55,000 hours of child care over 22 years. During that time she home schooled her daughters and continued her own independent study of human development. In 1989 she developed a seven-session parenting series called “Meeting the Needs of Children” which she teaches publicly and in the prison system with inmate parents. “If I had to put into one sentence all that I have learned about optimal human development and parenting it would be this: our effectiveness as parents is in direct proportion to the strength of the bond we have with our child. Securing and maintaining that bond is our primary work as parents and is the key to optimal human development.” For more information about Pam Leo and her publications, visit connectionparenting.com.

COMMENTS – 2 Responses
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1. 1. ChrstyMar 2nd, 2008 at 9:18 pm
“Sometimes we can’t hear our children’s needs because our own needs are screaming so loudly” When asked if I want to have more kids I always think, well if my Mr right walks into my life and I have acheived my hearts desire why not. I really enjoy kids. But till that time, till the day when I feel less needy myself I hardly thing my hearth would be the most welcoming for other children.
But what to do? We can’t make the kids magically disapear until we’ve got out acts sorted out and the pressures off. What I’ve found which makes the day flow a lot better now (I’m a full time stay at home mom with no relations about to help and dad is a hardworking man) is, following my destiny. In however small way I can now. Just admitting to my self that “well there are other things which drive me and bring me to new heights”, and working towards that helps the day go a lot better with the kids. Dropping the other preoccupations which demand my time and bring me no way close to my dream follows. Just focussing on that and child minding (and all which comes with it) makes my day flow nicer now.
And for me destiny drives me to sing and write songs and that, as funny as it may seem, has transformed my time with the boys. Composing doesn’t take half as long as writing a book does and that frees up lots of time. I am not anxious that they go to bed so I can have time to write anymore. I bring a pad along while they go rollerblading and jot down things there for example. I sing while we go walking (and I have to be careful what I sing too because they sing it right back to me word for words pitch for pitch- that’s our singing lessons!) We had a pretty amazing experience one day to a song I had wriiten called I Stand Naked. Well I got all excited about it and while singing started to take my clothes off. The boys were singing the lyrics too behind me. They wasted no time in whipping their clothes off and all three of us were gyrating in front of the mirror singing I stand Naked in your eyes.
So my advice is to spending quality time with your kids in way that both of you benefit is to follow your destiny and finding a way to include them in the experience. My boys are the first two people I’ve met who really don’t mind me singing the same song over and over again. And they have memorised all the lyrics to all my songs and the three year old asked me one day after singing ‘I’ve tried reaching you with ESP’ Mummy what is ESP? It certainly enriches the lives of our kids. Just seeing us excited about a project which they too can learn a bit from makes room for a great household athmosphere.

Save our languages (please read and take action)

Save our languages (please read and action)
Published date : 10-11-2008
Indigenous Languages Petition
TO THE HONOURABLE SPEAKER,MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVESThis petition of citizens from Australia and overseas both Indigenous and Non-Indigenous draws to the attention of the House that we are alarmed at the rate of unchecked language loss in Australia. Over 250 vigorous and vibrant languages on record at the time of European arrival in Australia have been reduced to just 17 which are being transmitted naturally to younger members of their communities. Some other languages are still spoken fluently but the vast majority are in varying states of decline and disrepair. There are also vigorous efforts across the country to maintain and revive languages, in some cases to re-introduce them after many decades of non-use.In the debate and activity addressing indigenous disadvantage indigenous languages have been overlooked. Language should be seen as a pathway to education, to healthier and wealthier communities, not as a separate subordinate issue.We therefore ask the House to develop a National Indigenous Languages Policy and a National Indigenous Languages Institute in order to strategically and coherently support the:
Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages (including creoles and Aboriginal Englishes)
Documentation and development of Indigenous Languages
Development of programs at all levels of Education
Development of numeracy and literacy targets in Indigenous Languages
Provision of interpreting and translation services (and training interpreters)
Expansion of employment options that recognise and utilise language knowledge and skills
Development of measures to increase the use of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages in the public domain (including music industry, TV, radio, press, public art and signage).

Signed:
Name:
Date:

PRINCIPAL PETITIONERName: Paul Herbert (Federation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages)To post or fax your vote print this form and post or fax to:Address: 295 King Street Melbourne VICPostcode: 3000Email: admin@fatsil.org.au Telephone: 03 9602 4700Fax: 03 9602 4770

To vote online click button. http://www.fatsil.org.au/component/option,com_joomlapetition/Itemid,/catid,1/func,viewcategory/ If You Have Any Problems Signing the Petition1) The Security-Code May Not Display. Please Try Again.2) There May Be A Typo In Your Email Address OR Security Code. Please Try Again.3) Don’t Receive A Confirmation Email? Please Check Your Junk Mail. If Still Nothing, Please Try Again.4) Anything Else? Please Email Us at: info@fatsil.org.au

The Barunga Statement

Attachment A – The Barunga Statement
We, the Indigenous owners and occupiers of Australia, call on the Australian Government and people to recognise our rights:
to self-determination and self-management, including the freedom to pursue our own economic, social, religious and cultural development;
to permanent control and enjoyment of our ancestral lands;
to compensation for the loss of use of our lands, there having been no extinction of original title;
to protection of and control of access to our sacred sites, sacred objects, artefacts, designs, knowledge and works of art;
to the return of the remains of our ancestors for burial in accordance with our traditions;
to respect for and promotion of our Aboriginal identity, including the cultural, linguistic, religious and historical aspects, and including the right to be educated in our own languages and in our own culture and history;
in accordance with the universal declaration of human rights, the international covenant on economic, social and cultural rights, the international covenant on civil and political rights, and the international convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination, rights to life, liberty, security of person, food, clothing, housing, medical care, education and employment opportunities, necessary social services and other basic rights.
We call on the Commonwealth to pass laws providing:
A national elected Aboriginal and Islander organisation to oversee Aboriginal and Islander affairs;
A national system of land rights;
A police and justice system which recognises our customary laws and frees us from discrimination and any activity which may threaten our identity or security, interfere with our freedom of expression or association, or otherwise prevent our full enjoyment and exercise of universally recognised human rights and fundamental freedoms.
We call on the Australian Government to support Aborigines in the development of an international declaration of principles for indigenous rights, leading to an international covenant.
And we call on the Commonwealth Parliament to negotiate with us a Treaty recognising our prior ownership, continued occupation and sovereignty and affirming our human rights and freedom.

Attachment B – Statement of Reconciliation
Learning from the Past As Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians seek to move forward together in a process of renewal, it is essential that we deal with the legacies of the past affecting the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including the First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis. Our purpose is not to rewrite history but, rather, to learn from our past and to find ways to deal with the negative impacts that certain historical decisions continue to have in our society today.
The ancestors of the First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis peoples lived on this continent long before explorers from other continents first came to North America. For thousands of years before this country was founded, they enjoyed their own forms of government. Diverse, vibrant Aboriginal nations had ways of life rooted in fundamental values concerning their relationship to the Creator, the environment, and each other, in the role of Elders as the living memory of their ancestors, and in their responsibilities as custodians of the lands, waters and resources of their homelands.
The assistance and spiritual values of the Aboriginal peoples who welcomed the newcomers to this continent too often have been forgotten. The contributions made by all Aboriginal peoples to Canada’s development, and the contributions they continue to make to our society today, have not been properly acknowledged. The Government of Canada today, on behalf of all Canadians, acknowledges those contributions.
Sadly, our history with respect to the treatment of Aboriginal people is not something in which we can take pride. Attitudes of racial and cultural superiority led to a suppression of Aboriginal culture and values. As a country we are burdened by past actions that resulted in weakening the identity of Aboriginal peoples, suppressing their languages and cultures and outlawing spiritual practices. We must recognise the impact of these actions on the once self-sustaining nations that were disaggregated, disrupted, limited or even destroyed by the dispossession of traditional territory, by the relocation of self-sustaining nations that were desegregated, disrupted, limited or even destroyed by the dispossession of traditional territory, by the relocation of Aboriginal people, and by some provisions f the Indian Act. We must acknowledge that the result of these actions was the erosion of the political, economic and social systems of Aboriginal people and nations.
Against the backdrop of these historical legacies, it is a remarkable tribute to the strength and endurance of Aboriginal people that they have maintained their historic diversity and identity. The Government of Canada today formally expresses to all Aboriginal people in Canada our profound regret for past actions of the federal government which have contributed to these difficult pages in the history of our relationship together.
One aspect of our relationship with Aboriginal people over this period that required particular attention is the Residential School system. This system separated many children from their families and communities and prevented them from speaking their own languages and from learning about their heritage and cultures. In the worst cases, it left legacies of personal pain and distress that continue to reverberate in Aboriginal communities to this day. Tragically, some children were the victims of physical and sexual abuse.
The Government of Canada acknowledges the role it played in the development and administration of these schools. Particularly to those individuals who experienced the tragedy of sexual and physical abuse at residential schools, and who have carried this burden believing that in some way they must be responsible, we wish to emphasize that what you experienced was not your fault and should never have happened. To those of you who suffered this tragedy at residential schools, we are deeply sorry.
In dealing with the legacies of the Residential School system, the Government of Canada proposes to work with First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis people, the Churches and other interested parties to resolve the outstanding issues that must be addressed. We need to work together on a healing strategy to assist individuals and communities in dealing with the consequences of this sad era in our history.
No attempt at reconciliation with Aboriginal people can be complete without reference to the sad events culminating in the death of MÚtis leader Louis Riel. These events cannot be undone: however, we can and will continue to look for ways of affirming the contributions of MÚtis people in Canada and of reflecting Louis Riel’s proper place in Canada’s history.
Reconciliation is an ongoing process. In renewing our partnership, we must ensure that the mistakes which marked our past relationship are not repeated. The Government of Canada recognizes that policies that sought to assimilate Aboriginal people, women and men, were not the way to build a strong country.
We must instead continue to find ways in which Aboriginal people can participate fully in the economic, political, cultural and social life of Canada in a manner which preserves and enhances the collective identities of Aboriginal communities, and allows them to evolve and flourish in the future. Working together to achieve our shared goals will benefit all Canadians, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal alike.
On behalf of the Government of Canada
The Honourable Jane Stewart, P.C, M.P. Minister for Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P. Federal Interlocutor for MÚtis and Non-Status Indians.

Attachment C – Preamble to the Constitution of South Africa
We, the people of South Africa,Recognise the injustices of our past; Honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land; Respect those who have worked to build and develop our country; and Believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity.We therefore, through our freely elected representatives, adopt this constitution as the supreme law of the Republic so as to – Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights; Lay the foundations for a democratic and open society in which government is based on the will of the people and every citizen is equally protected by law;Improve the quality of life of all citizens and free the potential of each person;and Build a united and democratic South Africa able to take its rightful place as a sovereign state in the family of nations. May God protect our people. Nkosi Sikelel’iAfrika. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso. God seen Suid Afrika. God bless South Africa. Mudzimu fhatutshedza Afurika. Hosi Katekisa Afrika.

A Call from The Wild: How today’s children need nature and how the future depends on it By Ian Cleary

A Call from The Wild: How today’s children need nature and how the future depends on it

I received Richard Louv’s new book the day I received the news that I was to become a father for the first time. The book, Last Child in the Woods, Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder, is a timely reminder of the challenges that lie before all parents, but an equally powerful recognition that my work as an environment educator has more purpose than ever!

Louv’s fascinating book highlights the broken relationship we have with our environment which stems from spending less time physically in nature. He links this separation from the natural world to many problems facing children today, including, diminished use of the senses, attention problems, and increased emotional and physical diseases including higher levels of childhood obesity and depression. Through a combination of compelling anecdotes and research, Louv argues a strong case for more focused studies, pointing out that no other generation in human history has had such levels of disconnection with nature. He suggests causes in the current crisis include a reduction of easily available open spaces, parental fear of injury or abuse, and, of course, the modern lures of being indoors.

Any adult who has experienced the delights of natural experiences knows the benefit. But sadly, Louv believes we may have ‘scared children straight out of the woods and fields’ and given in to a litigious culture that promotes organised sports as outdoor activities over unsupervised play in nature. In addition, he believes our fear of violent crime is based on a perceived risk exaggerated by biased media coverage.

Turning our attention to indoor technologies such as TV, computer games, home computers and the Internet, we find that these have had a double impact on child development. First, they take from available time that previous generations spent outdoors and, secondly, they only allow partial development of the senses and impede physical development. A line from Richard Louv’s book really drives home the challenge ahead, when he quotes a small boy saying. ‘I like to play indoors cause that’s where all the [power] outlets are.’

The book stresses the need to see play in nature not as leisure time but as something that is as crucial for our children’s development as a balanced diet or a good night’s sleep. He uses the term ‘Nature Deficit Disorder’ not to describe a medical condition but to describe the symptoms experienced when children are cut off from direct nature experiences. Louv’s examples tend to have an American focus, but in my ten years as an environmental educator I have come to believe it also exists in Australia and the UK and probably in most developed countries. It’s a symptom of a larger social problem that has children (and adults) spending less time in nature than in the past and developing more of a ‘virtual’ relationship with it.

So why is building cubby houses and catching tadpoles more important than computer skills and soccer? Studies into the effects of reduced nature experiences are limited, partly because no one took note of how much time children of the past spent outside. It was probably assumed that it would always be that way, and that it was only natural for kids to want to play outdoors. It would appear that for many this is no longer the case.

So what IS the impact of a less nature-based childhood?

The Biophilia Theory, championed by Harvard Professor E.O.Wilson, suggests that we actually have a biological need to be outdoors. We develop and thrive through the sensory input from the natural world and its absence can cause all manner of problems. A branch of psychology known as eco-psychology also supports this. Of particular interest is the work done on the apparent links between outdoor play and ADHD. Studies at Illinois University have shown that time spent outdoors in ‘green spaces’ can actually reduce the symptoms of ADHD. Louv wonders whether a lack of nature might also be a cause of such attention problems.

Nature seems to operate on a more relaxed timetable than our own. Something as simple as a walk on the beach or through a rainforest tends to have a calming effect on most people. Louv would argue that this calming effect is crucial in healthy childhood development.

Inspiring the environmentalists of the future

Of the many points Louv raises in his book, I would like to focus on one aspect that particularly concerns my profession. How do we as teachers and parents, teach about ‘the environment’ and what priority should we place on experiencing the real thing?

I believe environmental education in primary schools today should concentrate on physically getting into local forests and mangroves — learning to listen for and identify the calls of local birds, or to wander local bush land smelling, touching, tasting, listening to, and generally feeling an intimate connection with what sustains us.

Try this. Think of the term ‘environmental education’ and feel what comes to mind or what should be taught under this field. For many it gives rise to ideas of global warming, protecting rainforests and oceans, animal extinction, stopping whaling, conserving water and other catastrophes. All of that is certainly critical information for society to take on. But it’s just that — information. To change people’s actions they first have to associate the environment with something worth saving — something seen in terms of awe, wonder, beauty, vastness, inter-relationships, precious moments, complexity beyond knowing and love. With this firmly anchored in their hearts through direct experience, only then should we teach about the broader issues facing the environment. The problem is that without such direct experience of nature our kids get an imbalance of information; we risk focusing on the negatives before children develop an appreciation of the positives. It’s a little like learning about the deadly snakes before learning that most snakes are harmless and all have a crucial part to play in our environment.

How then do we relate to snakes? Are we motivated to protect them?

I often get asked the question, ‘At what age is it best to start teaching about major environmental issues?’ The answer is always the same — not until the child has had plenty of years experiencing, exploring and developing a fascination for what’s around them; not dinosaurs or Madagascan lemurs, but ‘their’ environment — real experiences. I believe the love of skinks in the backyard — not the panda bear in Asia — is more likely to drive children to live responsible environmental lives as adults.

Studies of the great environmentalists of the last hundred years show two things they have in common. First, they had a childhood rich in contact with nature, and secondly, a close relationship with an adult who was enthusiastic about the environment. These two options are becoming less available, at a time when the world actually needs more committed environmentalists. The role of teachers and parents in this equation is obvious.

A virtual relationship with nature

Ironically we live in a world where children know more about the earth, but less about their own backyard. The huge increase in information available online or through nature documentaries has almost taken the place of direct nature experiences for some. Kids will excitedly tell you of last night’s Discovery Channel documentary on monkeys, alligators, emperor penguins or lions of the Serengeti. But ask what bird just called and there are blank faces.

These amazing nature shows can perhaps do more harm than good by giving people an unreal expectation of nature. I often think back to a night walk I once led. We had been out for about an hour and in that time we had seen an echidna, a platypus, heard two types of owls calling, seen several species of frogs, a small snake and to top it off, we watched a yellow-bellied glider (a possum-like animal the size of a small cat) leap from a tall tree and, spreading flaps of skin between its legs, soar over our heads and land in a tree over 50 metres away!! At the end of the night when I asked what people thought, to my surprise several of the group, adults and children alike, were disappointed. On further questioning, they admitted they didn’t quite know what to expect, but thought they would see more ‘stuff’.

I often question younger children about animals they know. Invariably it is the tigers, lions, giraffes and elephants that first come to mind, demonstrating that their knowledge is primarily virtual, not built on experiences with their local fruit bats, frogs, gliders, possums, kangaroos, snakes and lizards. I would encourage parents to choose from the great range of children’s books available today that have an ‘Australiana’ focus.

Schools are doing an amazing job but maybe the environmental education that’s really needed goes beyond the remit of schools. In the past it has taken place on weekends and after school, in the backyard, down at the local creek or forest. It was spontaneous and unsupervised. Anecdotally, this time nowadays seems to have been taken up by other activities. Many of these nature experiences seem to be beyond formal schooling but not beyond family activities. I see huge potential here for parents to both generate environmental awareness and spend valuable time with their kids. Parents are in the best place to be that enthusiastic adult who can stimulate an interest in nature. Ultimately it will have a far greater impact on the planet than any household recycling or compost scheme.

A few years ago I worked as an Education Officer for the Oxford University’s Botanic Garden and I was asked to run kids activities once a month. It may surprise you, but I cringed at the thought of it. Not that I don’t love working with children, but I had done the ‘Kids Club’ gig at so many nature resorts and national parks, spanning a decade of school holidays and long weekends. They tended to turn into baby-sitting sessions, while the parent took a break or went off to explore on their own. It seemed like such a wasted opportunity for families to explore together. I felt for the kids and the parents as well. And so I modified the weekends from kids activities to family learning days.

The new activities I developed drew from the fascination that comes from exploring nature and from an observation that it’s often the parents who are unsure of how to ‘play’ in nature. It was a huge success and amazing to watch. Families shared the experience of learning and exploring, and parents eagerly took on the role of ‘Tour Guide’ for the day with the information I had primed them with. The activities challenged the adults to relax and enjoy their surrounds and they were often also inspired by their own child’s sense of awe. The adults soon had a ‘childlike’ fascination for what was before them. These creative and simple activities helped bring about a wonderful connection between parent, child and nature.

Over the years I have seen how many adults and children struggle being in nature. This disconnection creates a feeling of discomfort and sometimes even fear. But it never occurred to me that they may physically struggle too. The role that nature can play in the physical development of children hit me one spring morning in England. I took a school group of nine-year-olds walking through a beautiful wildflower meadow. These were kids from a rough estate who had had very few ‘outdoor’ experiences. As I watched them walk, I noticed that amongst all the laughter, they were struggling to walk over the uneven ground. Their teacher said that for many it was the first time that they had experienced uneven grass. Their brains were actually telling them, from past experience on the ovals and sidewalks, that grass is flat.

After these experiences, and now back in Australia I decided to write a book compiling all the years of activities that I have used to reconnect families with nature and with each other. I want to share beautiful ways to generate the awe and inspiration that nature provides, as well as the benefits that seem to follow.

From these activities comes a fascination for nature, confidence in being outdoors, the valuing of all life forms, improved self-esteem, imagination and creativity and a general honing of all the senses.

The activities also draw on another lesson that being in nature gives us and is particularly vital nowadays — the ability to slow down and ‘be’ at a more natural pace. Being in nature also gives us the gift of experiencing a place where there is no judgement. It is a place that eases our stresses while increasing our creativity. It has been beautiful to watch these activities heal what Richard Louv calls the ‘broken relationship with the earth’, while strengthening the bonds within the family.

Can we ever reconnect with nature?

I’ve thought a lot about whether an activity can ever actually ‘reconnect’ us with nature. It seems to me that we are never really disconnected. We breathe, we eat, we drink and in turn feed the earth with our waste and eventually our bodies. We are always connected as we ARE nature. We just live and behave as if we are not. So these so-called ‘reconnecting with nature’ activities actually help us to change our awareness of our place in nature; helping us to realise how deeply connected we always are.

It’s an exciting time to be alive and raise kids. I’m inspired by the incredible environmental movement, its dedicated teachers and rich spiritual traditions that are reawakening our awareness of our earthly origins. I want my children to live in a world rich in biodiversity and have a deep respect for others and nature, and see the role I played in helping them achieve it. It does take a commitment of time and energy, and often it feels like a movement against the tide. But I have a quotation on my office wall that I often look to for encouragement.

‘Some people know what they do. Others know why they do what they do. But nobody knows what they do, DOES.’

Hopefully through the work of enthusiastic parents and teachers, enough kids will develop an intimate love of their nature so that they will help drive us in a new direction — towards a life-sustaining society instead of our industrial growth society that is failing our children and our environment.

And so my thoughts turn from environmental educator to parent. How best to raise my child? I know the adult I am today is a result of my childhood. I cherish my memories of the outdoors, of camping, fishing, swimming, walking and, best of all, exploring. As a father-to-be, I know that I will be guided by that nostalgic view of a carefree childhood, and will make it a priority to give my child those opportunities. I also realise I will be challenged by the clash of past and present. I am not immune to the media messages about unsupervised play. The question is ‘Will I let my children explore on their own?’ I recognise the importance of nature and the harm caused by its absence, so the answer is ‘absolutely’. Not that I intend to disregard the potential dangers, it’s just that I will assess them against the risk to my child’s mental, physical and spiritual wellbeing of not having a nature-based upbringing.

Advice from me as an environmental educator is to be cautious about what we are teaching about the environment; push for school outings; fight to save the local bushland; meet your ‘neighbours’ (the birds, reptiles and frogs); read Louv’s book and most importantly, get out there. Merely being in nature will benefit you and your kids and … their kids. 

Published in Kindred issue 22, June 07

Ian Cleary is a passionate educator and speaker, whose environmental vision has taken him around Australia and the world. Now, as co-founder of True Nature Guides, he inspires people to experience and celebrate their profound connection with their inner and outer nature, their True Nature. To receive regular fun family activities, or updates on future workshops or publications, email Ian.

IS YOUR BATHROOM AS SAFE AS YOU THINK IT IS?

Did you know?
The greatest risk of CHEMICAL IS YOUR BATHROOM AS SAFE AS YOU THINK IT IS?
Did you know?
The greatest risk of CHEMICAL EXPOSURE for the Average Person is found in the BATHROOM
There are at least 125 suspected CARCINOGENIC ingredients found in everyday personal care products and cosmetics
Everyday products such as shampoo, bubble bath, toothpaste and moisturizer or body lo-tions including baby products contain industrial chemicals which are used in products such as engine degreasers, anti-freeze and oven cleaners
Your children may be in danger from baby shampoos, skin lotions, baby wipes and tooth-paste. According to doctors and medical researchers in the United States, Japan, Switzer-land and Germany, two common ingredients found in ordinary shampoos and skin products may be linked to cataracts, cancer, eye damage and even blindness in young children!
Artificial fragrances in most products contain neurotoxic substances and are toxic to hu-mans. They also decrease sperm count and formation.
Sodium Fluoride one of the active ingredients in Rat Poison is in commonly found in over 300 different types of toothpaste including children‘s varieties
Ingredients in many baby products such as Methyl Paraben are linked to cancer, reproduc-tive/developmental toxicity, allergies, immuno-toxicity and more. Bio-accumulation of these toxins are particularly harmful to babies because of the amount and long term expo-sure from birth.

Every day we buy products laced with a cocktail of chemicals causing us, our families and the en-vironment great harm. They are sold in supermarkets, health food stores, retail outlets and on-line advertised as natural, organic and safe to use.
Most of us have believed the lies and the hype… But now we know what to look out for .
Check the ingredient labels on the products in your bathroom cupboard and find out what they really are?
Be Vigilant! Check the ingredient list on your products.
Copyright © 2009 Niche Finders. All rights reserved.
Labels: Wellbeing

for the Average Person is found in the BATHROOM
There are at least 125 suspected CARCINOGENIC ingredients found in everyday personal care products and cosmetics
Everyday products such as shampoo, bubble bath, toothpaste and moisturizer or body lo-tions including baby products contain industrial chemicals which are used in products such as engine degreasers, anti-freeze and oven cleaners
Your children may be in danger from baby shampoos, skin lotions, baby wipes and tooth-paste. According to doctors and medical researchers in the United States, Japan, Switzer-land and Germany, two common ingredients found in ordinary shampoos and skin products may be linked to cataracts, cancer, eye damage and even blindness in young children!
Artificial fragrances in most products contain neurotoxic substances and are toxic to hu-mans. They also decrease sperm count and formation.
Sodium Fluoride one of the active ingredients in Rat Poison is in commonly found in over 300 different types of toothpaste including children‘s varieties
Ingredients in many baby products such as Methyl Paraben are linked to cancer, reproduc-tive/developmental toxicity, allergies, immuno-toxicity and more. Bio-accumulation of these toxins are particularly harmful to babies because of the amount and long term expo-sure from birth.

Every day we buy products laced with a cocktail of chemicals causing us, our families and the en-vironment great harm. They are sold in supermarkets, health food stores, retail outlets and on-line advertised as natural, organic and safe to use.
Most of us have believed the lies and the hype… But now we know what to look out for .
Check the ingredient labels on the products in your bathroom cupboard and find out what they really are?
Be Vigilant! Check the ingredient list on your products.
Copyright © 2009 Niche Finders. All rights reserved.

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